06.10.12 - 18.11.12

Claudia Wieser

Opening: Friday 5 October 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Furniture

KIOSK opens this season with Furniture, a solo show by Berlin-based artist Claudia Wieser (°1973, Freilassing, Germany). In this exhibition, Wieser presents an ensemble of drawings, ceramic and wooden sculptures, and a spatial intervention where the walls of the cabinet rooms are covered with black-and-white prints of interiors, creating an illusionistic perspective.

Wieser’s visual style is marked by an abstraction that is precise and consistent in its form, colour and materials. Like abstract paintings, Wieser’s glazed ceramic tiles consist of geometric patterns. In one case, these are combined to form a large sculpture that is placed in the hemicycle room like a free-standing folding screen. Surrounding the screen are wooden sculptures that are made up of elementary shapes like cylinders, cones and spheres. There is a thematic and pictorial resonance between the spatial intervention and the series of framed drawings and photographs overlaid with geometric compositions in gold leaf and pencil.

These pure studies in form and colour are indebted to the early twentieth-century Bauhaus legacy. Parallel to the teaching methods of this school, Wieser employs craftsmanship and a subjective palette in her attempt to attain an autonomous pictorial aesthetics in which functionality, art and spirituality are tightly interwoven. Her artistic research is based on complex references and universal, stylistic elements from art history. It appropriates the formal rules of early modernist artworks and questions their objectivity, realism and functionality.

This method and the title of the exhibition also point us to the central concern of Wieser’s current work: what is the status of sculptures that have been designed as objects? Wieser’s oeuvre is developed in response to this question and it explores the boundaries between pure and applied forms of art. The artist intensifies the primary relations between form, matter and concept in order to bring out the pure appearance of the image itself. Only then the internal nature of the object can be externalized.

Claudia Wieser has exhibited solo at Sies+Höke Gallery, Düsseldorf (2012), Galleria S.A.L.E.S, Rome (2012), Galerie Ben Kaufmann, Berlin (2011), The Drawing Center, New York (2010), Schauort, Zurich (2010), Galerie Eva Winkeler, Frankfurt (2009), and Kunstverein Oldenburg with Bernd Ribbeck (2009). Recent collective exhibitions in which she participated have been held at Marta Herford / Museum Schloss Moyland (2012), Gerog Kolbe Museum Berlin (2011), Kunstmuseum Stuttgart / Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (2011), Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York (2011) and K21 Kunstsammlungen Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf (2010).

Furniture

Author: Liene Aerts, Alexander Garcia Düttmann, Zoë Gray, Wim Waelput

The publication appears on the occasion of Claudia Wieser’s exhibition 'Furniture' at KIOSK (06.10.2012 – 18.11.2012).

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13.04.12 - 10.06.12

Jan Kempenaers

Opening: Friday 13 April 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

In Search of the Picturesque

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK lets the photographic output of Belgian artist Jan Kempenaers engage with the monumental work of German artist Karsten Födinger. These contrasting practices both start from a landscape context – rural or urban – to subsequently translate them to autonomous aesthetics of the image within a spatial or photographic exhibition frame. As such, it affects our assumptions of recognizable landscape typologies.

As part of his PhD in the visual arts, Jan Kempenaers’ show In Search of the Picturesque presents an overview of the artist’s photographic work of the past years. The body of work represents a visual study of the eighteenth-century notion of the picturesque in the present-day landscape image and its contemporary relevance. The particular picturesque mood evoked by Kempenaers in his photographic oeuvre, strongly manifests itself in his recent ruins pictures and natural landscapes such as inhospitable rock formations and thick forests; images that specifically engage with our conceptualization of the nineteenth-century romantic landscape. Although much less explicitly, the characteristics of the picturesque are also apparent in Kempenaers’ earlier works: these photographic series show massive Yugoslav monuments in deserted natural landscapes, or panoramic urban and industrial landscapes. Whether the pictures frame ‘unspoilt’ wildernesses, a politically charged monument as a modern variant of the ‘romantic’ ruins, or an urban typology, they invariably employ a recognizable, picturesque visual style to represent a specific undeniable contemporary reality.

Jan Kempenaers (1968, Heist-op-den-Berg, Belgium) has recently exhibited solo at Be-Part Waregem (2010), de Garage Mechelen (2010) and Middelheimmuseum Antwerp (2007). His work has been part of numerous group shows, including some at M HKA Antwerp (2012), BOZAR Brussels (2011), S.M.A.K. Ghent (2009) and MARTa Herford (2009).

13.04.12 - 10.06.12

Karsten Födinger

Opening: Friday 13 April 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Void

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK lets the monumental work of German artist Karsten Födinger engage with the photographic output of Belgian artist Jan Kempenaers. These contrasting practices both start from a landscape context – rural or urban – to subsequently translate them to autonomous aesthetics of the image within a spatial or photographic exhibition frame. As such, it affects our assumptions of recognizable landscape typologies.

Karsten Födinger’s massive sculptures and architectural installations take shape in proportion to the exhibition space. His site-specific interventions exude a captivating physical presence. Both in their construction and engineering and in the use of unpolished and functional materials, the sculptures refer to the building sector and its basic industrial typologies.
For his show Void, Födinger realizes a new piece for KIOSK’s central dome room. Födinger constructs a sculpture in ‘rebars’, suggesting the shape of the steel reinforcements of a bridge pier. Födinger filters this element from reality and translates it to a personal, utopian creation process, which precisely sets out from an imaginary functionality, offering up space for a subjective experience. As hinted at by the show’s title, the sculpture not only functions through its self-evident materiality, but just as much through the emptiness that comes with it. The work’s meaning is generated not so much in its formal appearance as in the process of its physical realization.

The exhibition is realised with the generous support of Nv Staalbeton.

Karsten Födinger (1978, Mönchengladbach, Germany) has presented solo exhibitions at Kunst Halle St. Gallen (2012) and Palais de Tokyo Paris (2011). His work has been on display in group shows on numerous occasions, including at Temporäre Kunsthalle Berlijn (2010) and Kunsthaus Baselland Muttenz (2010). Karsten Födinger is represented by RaebervonStenglin in Zürich.

10.02.12 - 25.03.12

Nick Oberthaler

Opening: Friday 10 February 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Eventuality of an Attempt

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK is a double-bill of solo presentations by Austrian artist Nick Oberthaler (°1981, Bad Ischl, based in Brussels) and Dutch artist Sara van der Heide (°1977, Busan, based in Amsterdam).
In their presentations, both artists investigate the possibilities fundamentally inherent in the pictorial medium. Oberthaler mainly focuses on the formal pictorial traditions, prying them open to widen their scope, where Van der Heide examines art-historical dogmas and historical political certainties from a contemporary perspective. The works on display in both cases testify of a specific sensitivity for the incorporeal aspects of painting, watercolours or drawing.

Nick Oberthaler brings his show Eventuality of an Attempt to KIOSK. The attempt in question is one he will undertake to attain a condensed atmospheric experience through the use of mixed techniques on paper, sculpture and the integration of a spatial intervention. But the title also stresses the precariousness of this attempt and the idea that the exhibition’s form will never be fully realized or ‘complete’.
Oberthaler is fully aware of the traditional formal components of which the pictorial representation of a landscape is composed. Horizontal lines slide through several of his abstract geometric designs like so many limitless horizons in landscapes.
The same intention will also gear the treatment of KIOSK’s architectural landscape: the central dome room accommodates four equal spaces created by a cruciform construction of gypsum board. Some of the wall boards function as temporary drawing and painting surfaces, others bear Oberthaler’s pictorial ‘canvases on paper’ and ‘paint drawings’ that are mainly made with Indian ink, wax, pastels, gouache, photographic fragments and collages. These expand onto the mirror-covered wall construction to become three-dimensional temporary landscapes. The work thus explores the material and spatial boundaries of painting. With German romanticism as an undercurrent throughout Eventuality of an Attempt, the artist expresses the yearning to reach a similar level of the sublime through reduction.

10.02.12 - 25.03.12

Sara van der Heide

Opening: Friday 10 February 2012 - 00:00

Exhibition
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK is a double-bill of solo presentations by Dutch artist Sara van der Heide (°1977, Busan, based in Amsterdam) and Austrian artist Nick Oberthaler (°1981, Bad Ischl, based in Brussels) .
In their presentations, both artists investigate the possibilities fundamentally inherent in the pictorial medium. Oberthaler mainly focuses on the formal pictorial traditions, prying them open to widen their scope, where Van der Heide examines art-historical dogmas and historical political certainties from a contemporary perspective. The works on display in both cases testify of a specific sensitivity for the incorporeal aspects of painting, watercolours or drawing.

Sara van der Heide presents a series of twenty watercolours under the title of Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20 (2011). The series is based on a drawing from 1927 by Lena Bergner, a student of Paul Klee’s at the Bauhaus in Weimar. The pictorial theories of this institute for the arts and of Paul Klee are analyzed in Van der Heide’s watercolours in their wider, ideological and theoretical framework. The serial method and modernist ideals from the twenties and thirties constitute the basis for new, hybrid combinations.
Lena Bergner’s original drawing is called Belichtung/Beschattung and shows a small circle in the upper left from which several rays of light and colour start, to fan out in a larger circle. In her twenty variations on Bergner’s drawing, Van der Heide sets out to examine the fundamental characteristics of watercolour painting such as colour and light. Her works are presented in a horizontal band in the cabinet adjacent to KIOSK’s dome room, like a waving light beam of colour and shape. The space between the colour exercises is charged with ‘cosmic energy’, a concept Paul Klee used to point out that art and nature spring from the same source and are both part of a greater, cosmic whole.

09.12.11 - 22.01.12

Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan

Opening: Friday 9 December 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.

Subi dura a rudibus

The adjoining room at KIOSK becomes a projection space for the film diptych ‘Subi dura a rudibus’ (16mm, 26’, 2010) by the Dutch artist duo Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan. The inspiration for their silent film is a sixteenth-century series of tapestries depicting the 1535 conquest of Tunis under Charles V. The tapestries were designed by Jan Cornelisz. Vermeyen, a painter at the Habsburg court who accompanied the troops of Charles V as an ‘embedded artist’ appointed to make drawings of the expedition.

The film shows the drawn designs mirrored and juxtaposed to the tapestries. The diptych refers to the tension between objectivity and interpretation: the mirror images recall the well-known inkblots of the psychological Rorschach test and confront us with the differences between the original drawings and the tapestry weaver’s translation of them.

09.12.11 - 22.01.12

Slavs and Tatars

Opening: Friday 9 December 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.

Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK shows work of international artist collective Slavs and Tatars and of Dutch duo Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan. Both ground their artistic practice in research and explore the interactions between the historical, the social and the political by way of association.

By their own account, the artist collective Slavs and Tatars has, since its inception in 2005, been mapping an area that stretches between the former Berlin Wall and the Great Wall of China. They focus on an oft-overseen cultural overlap between Slavs, Caucasians and Central Asians and humorously but polemically disrupt a univocal Western interpretation. The installations, performances, lectures and print publications that make up these alternative spheres of influence, form a playful mosaic of associations combining elements from a spectrum of high and low culture.

At KIOSK, Slavs and Tatars present a number of works under the collective title Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz. The solo show is in part an elaboration of the project of the same name they presented at the tenth Sharjah Biennial earlier this year. The multimedia Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz shows the unlikely common history of Iran and Poland. The revolutionary potential of handiwork and folklore behind two important geopolitical shifts – the Iranian Revolution of 1979, and the fall of Communism in 1989 heralded by the Polish Solidarność – are activated and explored as a source of mystical protest. This subject was first explored in the 79.89.09. project that consisted of a series of lectures,  a contribution to Berlin-based magazine 032c, a newspaper edition that is being reprinted for the KIOSK show, and the mirror mosaic Resist Resisting God (2010) that is also on display at KIOSK. Further, the central dome room will be taken in by a series of colourful sewn banners boasting re-interpreted, creolized slogans from the Iranian Revolution and the Solidarność movement.

79.89.09.

Author: Slavs and Tatars

The publication is a reissue on the occasion of Slavs and Tatars’s exhibition ‘Friendship of Nations: Polish sh’ite showbiz’ at KIOSK (10.12.2011 – 22.01.2012).

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07.10.11 - 27.11.11

Zin Taylor

Opening: Saturday 8 October 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.

Growth

KIOSK opens the new season with Growth, a solo exhibition by Brussels-based Canadian artist Zin Taylor (1978). Taylor’s work is often rooted in narrative structures that are translated into sculptures, drawings, graphic works, performances and video works.

Taylor’s investigative attitude points to a remarkable fascination for natural forms which he transposes to sculpture through the use of traditional techniques, artisan methods and sculptural principles. It is this, the very nature of sculpture, that the title of the exhibition alludes to; the organic development of form. The works on display in Growth can thus be seen as variations on one central question: how does form materialize? How do works of art grow?

The artist’s ongoing inquiry into the development of a fundamental, sculptural form as a densely layered and organically growing process finds one of its most outspoken realizations in The Bakery of Blok, a work from 2009 that will be reinterpreted for KIOSK’s central hemicycle room. This installation, consisting of a series of materialist ‘units’, unfolds a complex narrative that interacts with the exhibition’s architecture.

Zin Taylor is represented by Galerie Vidal Cuglietta (Brussels); Jessica Bradley Art + Projects (Toronto); and Supportico Lopez (Berlin). Ursula Blickle Stiftung (Kraichtal), Contemporary Art Museum (St. Louis), Miguel Abreu Gallery (New York) and Etablissement d’en Face Projects (Brussels) all hosted solo shows by Taylor. Group shows in which he participated have been held at Witte de With (Rotterdam), Power Plant (Toronto) and Contemporary Art Gallery (Vancouver), among others.

The Allegorical Function Of Dirt: A Discussion With Aki Tsuyuko's Ongakushitsu

Author:

The publication appears on the occasion of Zin Taylor’s exhibition ‘Growth’ at KIOSK (08.10.2011 – 27.11.2011).

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22.04.11 - 12.06.11

Jan De Cock

Opening: Friday 22 April 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.

Improvise and Overcome

Jan De Cock (Brussels, 1976) garnered fame with his ‘Denkmal’: monuments, temporary installations made of wooden modules and photographic images that subtly integrate with the architectural and spatial context of their specific location. De Cock lets his interdisciplinary work engage in a dialogue with art-historical, architectural and cinematographical references, leading the visitor through a rhythmic course of repetition, linearity, fragmentation and perspective.

Improvise and Overcome is the title De Cock chose for his creation for the central round space of the KIOSK gallery, where he has installed an ‘infini’. This freestanding structure refers to the nineteenth-century panorama. The installation functions as a support for a series of two-dimensional interventions and a new sculpture.

22.04.11 - 12.06.11

Derek Sullivan

Opening: Friday 22 April 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.

Young Americans

With Derek Sullivan and Jan De Cock, KIOSK has invited two artists who examine the history of contemporary art through their works. Both artists suggest that the interpretation of this history and its visual heritage is not a self-contained narrative, but always contains a new proposition.

Derek Sullivan (Toronto, 1976) makes drawings, gouaches and sculptural work in which he combines the visual aesthetics of American geometric abstraction, modernist design and graphic art with shapes and forms borrowed from the realm of conceptual art.

Sullivan’s characteristic large-format monochrome prints function as a backdrop for drawings and gouaches that combine geometric patterns and textual elements. Fascinated by artist’s books, Sullivan regularly publishes work, making ample use of the possibilities of print-on-demand.

Young Americans, the title of his KIOSK show, refers to the exhibition catalogues the New York MoMA published during the 1950s, an age where the interest for contemporary American art peaked. Fragments from these catalogues are being reproduced as posters, and combine with drawings and the fan-shaped architecture of the KIOSK cabinet rooms to make up separate pages of an imaginary book.