04.04.14 - 15.06.14

Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc

Exhibition
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Eric Baudelaire & Mathieu Abonnenc, 'L'œil se noie', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.

L’œil se noie

The exhibition L’œil se noie is the result of an intuitive dialogue between the two French artists Eric Baudelaire and Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc. Their work stems from a shared interest in the gaps and fissures that make up stories, as well as the challenges and promises they hold.

At the heart of their practices is a desire to highlight the tensions between what has been, what seems to be, and what could have been; to pick up the traces of forgotten and unresolved questions and divert them towards uncertain destinations, out of the dead-end circuits where things and thoughts get trapped in their own finitudes. In short, L’œil se noie is about “unfinished business”, as one of the pieces in the show suggests. Sometimes quite literally, as in the case of Abonnenc’s search for the lost film Guns for Banta (1970) by Sarah Maldoror, a film dealing with the struggle for the independence in Guinea and Cape Verde that has never seen the light of day, or Baudelaire’s work The Makes based on some of Michelangelo Antonioni’s unrealized scenarios.

In other cases, their work consists more of a rewiring of connections between one sense and another, between one time and another. The film work Ça va, ça va, on continue, for example, highlights the complications implicit in remembering, representing and voicing distant histories of anti-colonial revolt and revolutionary insurrection. Chanson d’Automne, in turn, is an assemblage of clippings from The Wall Street Journal dated September 2008 that reveals a poetry of resistance within the fracture lines of a dysfunctional economic order. At odds with all laments of the ‘death of the image’ and the ‘end of history’, the works in this exhibition propose a renewed faith in the hidden potential of the present, puncturing the impasses and aporias of finitude, and giving way to the necessarily unfinished spaces for wandering and wondering.

L’œil se noie is organized in conjunction with The Fire Next Time, a two day program of interventions and screenings dealing with the militant image and its resonances (03.04.2014-04.04.2014, KASK - School of Arts Gent). Both events are organized as part of The Uses of Art – The Legacy of 1848 and 1989, a project initiated by the museum confederation L’Internationale. More information: www.thefirenexttime.be

Paris-based artist Eric Baudelaire’s (1973, Salt Lake City) recent solo exhibitions were held at Bétonsalon, Paris; Kunsthall, Bergen; Galerie Greta Meert, Brussels; Beirut Art Center, Lebanon; Gasworks, London; and The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.
Occasions and venues where he has recently participated in group shows include 8th Taipei Biennial, Taiwan; Baltic Triennial of International Art, Vilnius; Berlin Documentary Forum II, Haus der Kulturen der Welt; La Triennale, Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Le Plateau / FRAC, Paris; FRAC, Metz; and Casino Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
His films have been in competition at many festivals including Locarno, FID Marseille and International Film Festival Rotterdam.

Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc (1977, French Guiana, currently based in Metz) has recently presented his work in solo shows in such venues as Kunsthalle Basel; Bielefelder Kunstverein; Fondation Serralves, Porto; Pavilion, Leeds; La Ferme du Buisson, Noisiel; Marcelle Alix, Paris; and Gasworks, London.
Among others, his work was included in numerous group shows: Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; MUDAM, Luxembourg; Khiasma, Les Lilas; MAC Marseille; La Triennale, Palais de Tokyo, Paris; 14th Prix Fondation d’entreprise Ricard, Paris; ICA- Institute of contemporary art, University of Pennsylvania; Gasworks, London; Museum of Modern Art, Paris; and FRAC Lorraine, Metz.

Related events:

01.04.14, 20:00, lecture @ Cirque, KASK-School of Arts Ghent:
Lecture by Mathieu Abonnenc at the School of Arts, University College Ghent. This lecture has been organized within the framework of his exhibition at KIOSK.
(in collaboration with KASK lecture series)

04.04.2014, 22:00, concert @ Minard Schouwburg:
The opening of ‘L’œil se noie’ will be followed by a concert at Minard theatre at 10 pm
In collaboration with Courtisane and Vooruit. The compositions ‘Crazy Nigger en Gay Guerilla’ for 4 pianos will be performed by Frederik Croene, Bob Gilmore, Stéphane Ginsburgh and Reinier van Houdt. Tickets at Vooruit.
(in collaboration with Courtisane & Vooruit)

06.04.2014, 11:00, film @ SPHINX:
Film screening of ‘The Ugly One’ (2013) by Eric Baudelaire
(part of the Courtisane festival)

03.04.2014 & 04.04.2014, event @ KASK-School of Arts Ghent:
‘THE FIRE NEXT TIME - Afterlives of the militant image’ is a two-day programme of interventions, screenings and performances dealing with the militant image and its resonances. ‘The Fire Next Time’ is organized in the context of the research project ‘Figures of Dissent’ by Stoffel Debuysere at KASK-School of Arts.
(KIOSK and KASK in association with L’Internationale, in collaboration with Courtisane)

Performances at Minard Schouwburg:
- 03.04.14, 20:30: ‘Möglichkeitsraum (The Blast of the Possible)’: performance by Angela Melitopoulos & Bettina Knaup.
- 03.04.14, 22:00: ‘When we act or undergo, we must always be worthy of what happens to us’: performance by Ayreen Anastas & Rene Gabri

Full program: www.thefirenexttime.be.

L’œil se noie is organized with the support of the Culture Programme of the European Union and with the support of the French Embassy in Belgium.

07.02.14 - 23.03.14

Hamza Halloubi

Opening: Friday 7 February 2014 - 20:00

Exhibition
Hamza Halloubi, 'Appear', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Hamza Halloubi, 'Appear', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Hamza Halloubi, 'Appear', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Hamza Halloubi, 'Appear', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Hamza Halloubi, 'Appear', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Hamza Halloubi, 'Appear', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Hamza Halloubi, 'Appear', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Hamza Halloubi, 'Appear', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.

Appear

KIOSK presents a duo show with work by Moroccan artist Hamza Halloubi (1982, currently based in Brussels and Tangier), and Lebanese artist Rana Hamadeh (1983, currently based in Rotterdam). Both artists seek out the fictionalized and subjective narrative within the public reality of our existence. Their stories offer an alternative for the conventional understandings of history, language, identity and difference.

With his video work, Hamza Halloubi aims for an essentialized reading experience. He reduces the image to its most elementary form: a cinema that captures and transforms reality. Austerely shot footage, voice-overs, familiar-looking spaces such as living rooms or theatres, and subjects like solitude, dislocation, and institution are elements that recur throughout his work. Guided by the artist-author’s voice, Halloubi’s work maintains a philosophical aspect that refers both to theoretical knowledge and to personal memories. After surveying a place or person in its entirety, he penetrates the surface towards a more complex history of the subject matter.

The exhibition Appear is focalized around the materialization of an appearance and its inner thoughts, knowledge and memory. At KIOSK, Halloubi presents a new work in progress that takes a fascination for Iranian actress Golshifteh Farahani as its starting point. Farahani plays the part of a public Hollywood personality and diva, but at the same time she is a political refugee who carefully shields her identity and personality from the public. The question as to how a figure like Farahani might appear leads to extensive research into her appearance and the various idealizations that are projected upon her by the language of cinema and media in the West and the East. The resulting portrait, Appear, developed from the idea of the unapproachable and the possibilities under these conditions for two people to meet directly or indirectly in front of a camera. Two more video pieces, Letter to Aura (2012) and Apparitions à Soco Chico (2013) relate to the same theme. Letter to Aura starts from the artist’s subjective narration to reflect on his specific geopolitical location. Apparitions à Soco Chico questions the contemporary perception of filmed images in relation to the history of cinema.

07.02.14 - 23.03.14

Rana Hamadeh

Opening: Friday 7 February 2014 - 20:00

Exhibition
Rana Hamadeh, 'Craters formed by fallen Meteorites, Arizona, Press Photo', 1942, Courtesy of the Artist
Rana Hamadeh, 'Craters formed by fallen Meteorites, Arizona, Press Photo', 1942, Courtesy of the Artist
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Rana Hamadeh, 'A River in A Sea in A River', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.

A River In A Sea In A River

KIOSK presents a duo show with work by Lebanese artist Rana Hamadeh (1983, currently based in Rotterdam), and Moroccan artist Hamza Halloubi (1982, currently based in Brussels and Tangier). Both artists seek out the fictionalized and subjective narrative within the public reality of our existence. Their stories offer an alternative for the conventional understandings of history, language, identity and difference.

Rana Hamadeh’s practice currently revolves around GRAPHIS N°127 and Alien Encounters, two overarching long-term projects in which found documents, historical events, personal encounters and fiction are interwoven in new installations, publications and lecture performances. Throughout her fictional tales and scripted performances, the artist questions the conditions of looking and interpreting, the restrictive nature and the authority of signification.

The exhibition A River In A Sea In A River is a further exploration of the themes of Alien Encounters by way of a theatrical scenography: a large installation in the central exhibition room presents a map and a series of objects that set out the storylines of the research at hand. The table piece can be read as a non-linear sequence of political events, associative traces and cultural constructions that problematize the notion of ‘alienness’. Hamadeh’s fascination for the ‘alien’ encompasses not only the extra-terrestrial being, but also the outsider, the outlaw, and his potential for resistance. A River In A Sea In A River aims for a narrative topology with an expanding cartographic network of stories, places and encounters. Hamadeh considers the installation a functional ‘war map’ and ‘catwalk’, a tailor-made tool to be employed in her lecture performances in the exhibition space.

29.11.13 - 26.01.14

Pratchaya Phinthong

Opening: Friday 29 November 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.

A proposal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)

KIOSK presents a duo exhibition featuring the work of Thai artist Pratchaya Phinthong (1974, currently based in Bangkok) and American artist Zachary Formwalt (1979, currently based in Amsterdam). The practices of these two artists share an outspoken discursive and essayistic quality. In their research they reveal connections between historical, social and political events and search for ways to express social and economic processes that are less visible.

Pratchaya Phinthong initiates a new project dealing with methane hydrate or ‘burning ice’ at KIOSK. The artist is fascinated by the poetic image of burning ice, and also by its metaphorical potential in light of important current geostrategic and social issues such as energy, the economy, and ecology. The sedimentary deposits of methane hydrate are estimated to contain anywhere between two and ten times the amount of methane of the entire known reserves of natural gas. As such, they form a potentially crucial future source of fossil fuel. Phinthong deploys this thought-provoking idea as a conceptual tool for organizing his show A proposal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process).

Pratchaya Phinthong has had solo exhibitions presented at places such as Chisenhale Gallery, London (2013); Lothringer13_Halle, Munich (2013); gb agency, Paris (2012); Centre d’Art Contemporain, Rennes (2012); Galeria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Bergamo (2011) and the Centre d’art contemporain, Brétigny (2010). Occasions and venues where he has recently participated in group shows include MUMOK, Vienna (2013); Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2013); dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel; New Museum Triennial, New York (2012); Taipei Biennial, Taiwan (2012); Kadist Art Foundation, Paris (2011) and Kunsthalle Basel (2011).

29.11.13 - 26.01.14

Zachary Formwalt

Opening: Friday 29 November 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin. Film still 'In Light of the Arc', 2013-2014. Courtesy of the artist.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin. Film still 'In Light of the Arc', 2013-2014. Courtesy of the artist.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.

A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject

KIOSK presents a duo exhibition featuring the work of American artist Zachary Formwalt (1979, currently based in Amsterdam) and Thai artist Pratchaya Phinthong (1974, currently based in Bangkok). The practices of these two artists share an outspoken discursive and essayistic quality. In their research they reveal connections between historical, social and political events and search for ways to express social and economic processes that are less visible.

Zachary Formwalt’s show A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject is conceived as a three-part video and photo series dealing with our contemporary global economy. In his work Formwalt repeatedly returns to the metaphorical image of the stock exchange and the inability to visualize the perpetually circulating flows of capital in the world of finance. The first part of this show, the video Unsupported Transit (2011), focuses on the construction site of the new stock exchange in the Chinese city of Shenzhen, designed by Rem Koolhaas’s Office for Metropolitan Architecture. Shenzhen has a special status as an economic zone where the authorities allow the system of the free market to run its course. While Unsupported Transit merely scans the outside of the building, the second piece in the series shows the interior of the finished stock exchange. The video diptych In Light of the Arc (2013) registers the materialization of a place that is paradoxically marked by an increasing dematerialization. As the stock trade is now entirely controlled by IT and advanced logarithms the trade floor with its iconic golden bell has come to serve a merely ceremonial function. The third part of the series turns to architect Hendrik Petrus Berlage’s stock exchange in Amsterdam. Here Formwalt focuses on the question of how Berlage was capable of matching his idealistic, socialist ideas with the capitalist function of the building. This final part of the series is presented here as ongoing research in photographs and documents; the definitive video piece will be finished in the course of 2014.

The exhibition by Zachary Formwalt was made possible with the support of the Mondriaan Fund.

Zachary Formwalt has presented his work in solo shows in such venues as D+T Project, Brussels (2013); ar/ge kunst Galerie Museum, Bolzano (2011); Casco—Office for Art, Design and Theory, Utrecht (2010); Wexner Center for the Arts: The Box, Columbus, Ohio (2010); Kunsthalle Basel (2009); Elder Gallery, Lincoln (2006) and the Rooseum Center for Contemporary Art, Malmö (2005). He has also participated in film festivals and group shows such as the International Film Festival Rotterdam (2013); Liquid Assets at Steirischer Herbst, Graz (2013); Image Employment at MoMA PS1, New York (2013) and the European Media Art Festival in Osnabrück (2013). In 2012 Formwalt won the Illy Prize in Rotterdam.

27.09.13 - 17.11.13

Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu

Opening: Friday 27 September 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Courtesy Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren.
Courtesy Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection André Magnin, Paris.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection André Magnin, Paris.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection Pierre Loos, Brussels.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection Pierre Loos, Brussels.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin

Patterns for (Re)cognition

KIOSK presents the duo show Patterns for (re)cognition, with works by Belgian artist Vincent Meessen (1971, Baltimore, US) and Congolese artist Tshyela Ntendu (ca. 1890 – ca. 1950, Congo). The exhibition makes unexpected connections between the various uses of abstraction in psychology, art and design.

During his current research on colonial psychology, Vincent Meessen was intrigued by the relation between the formal abstraction of certain cognitive tests and Western geometrical abstract art. By displaying a curated section of abstract paintings from the late 1920s by one of the two so-called first modern Congolese artists, the pioneer Tshyela Ntendu (aka Djilatendo), Meessen proposes a ‘constructivist scenario’ that problematizes the Western narrative of abstraction in regard to so-called primitive ornament.

The title, Patterns for (re)cognition, refers to the jargon of cognitive psychology and in particular to the tests designed to measure the capacity of our brain for abstraction and memory; mental operations that are based on recognition and identification of recurrent impulses (signs, sounds, forms, patterns, letters, faces …).

26.04.13 - 16.06.13

Kelly Schacht

Opening: Friday 27 September 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Laurent Fobe.

It seems economical to make use of a character already in play

KIOSK presents an exhibition that combines work by Belgian artist Kelly Schacht and Swedish artist Annika Eriksson.
Kelly Schacht responds to the exhibition space and Annika Eriksson’s work. For the duration of her show It seems economical to make use of a character already in play the empty rooms will be activated by temporary interventions or ‘characters’ whose performative presence will resound in the human absence emphasized by Eriksson. This approach is based in the uncertain and in coincidence: an openness that is prerequisite for Schacht’s ongoing research into the perception and practice of exhibiting and the dynamic space in which it takes place. By way of theatrical constructions, Schacht stages a fragmented dialogue between space and matter, illusion and reality.

In ‘It seems economical to make use of a character already in play’ this approach results in a scenario, tailored to the exhibition space, that will unfold over the course of the seven weeks of the exhibition. Like a postscript, this minimal scenography will address what is hidden and appeal to the visitors’ imagination.

Both artists – each grounded in their respective generations – work with the same kind of ideas in presentations that rely on the staged and the imaginary, and on the factors of time, language, the viewer and social interaction. With their cinematographic constructions and minimal interventions they introduce the audience into a fragmented narrative dimension. Where Eriksson mainly directs the exhibition space through the use of film, Schacht manipulates it with the aid of objects and people. Both narrative styles make use of the reversal of time and language, giving their scenarios an aura both of recognition and of the indefinable, like blind spots or ambiguous vacuums in space and time.

Kelly Schacht received the 2011 Young Belgian Painters Award and has showed her work at the Gwangju Biennial (2012); De Vleeshal, Middelburg (2011); Hoet Bekaert Gallery, Ghent; Cultuurcentrum Strombeek, Grimbergen; Coupe de ville, Sint-Niklaas (2010); Netwerk – Centre for Contemporary Art (2008); and in Coming People in S.M.A.K, Ghent (2006), among others. She is represented by Meessen De Clercq, Brussels.

26.04.13 - 16.06.13

Annika Eriksson

Opening: Friday 26 April 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.

I am the dog that was always here (loop)

KIOSK presents an exhibition that combines work by Swedish artist Annika Eriksson and Belgian artist Kelly Schacht.
With ‘I am the dog that was always here (loop)’, KIOSK presents the first exhibition in Belgium by Annika Eriksson. Eriksson bases her work in scenarios where the perception of time, structures of power, and once acclaimed social visions are called into question. Strategically, she plays with debates around the public realm and structures that regulate it, revealing urban changes and how this is subject to unexpected political appropriations and inversions.

Eriksson’s works in the exhibition engages with questions of time, its documented forms, and its reversal. Throughout the rooms, Eriksson sets up a number of possible scenarios in video works and three-dimensional interventions that include photographs, light boxes and panes of glass – extended elements of the film in space. The central piece of the presentation is the new video installation in the hemicycle room called I am the dog that was always here (loop) (2013). The video, set in the outskirts of Istanbul, focuses on moments of transition and marginalised experiences of time, seen through the lens of a street dog. Having been moved by the authorities to peripheral pockets and no man’s lands outside the expanding city, the dogs are continuously moving along lines of gentrification and corporate city making. Through looping and repetition, Eriksson relates this process to an experience of time: exploring the present as a complex gap between past and future, one in which an increasing process of erasure, spurred on by a shrinking public realm, also removes other registers of being and seeing.

Annika Eriksson’s I am the dog that was always here (loop) was realized with the support of the Goethe-Institut, Istanbul.

Annika Eriksson has previously presented solo shows in, or was commissioned by: When Attitudes Became Form Become Attitudes, Wattis Institute, San Francisco (2012); Kunstlerhaus Stuttgart (2012); Europe N, GFZK, Leipzig (2011); DAAD Galerie, Berlin (2010); Hayward Gallery, London (2010) and Sheffield Biennale (2008). Eriksson took part in numerous international group shows including Shanghai Biennale and Kiev Biennale (2012), Venice Biennale (2005) and Sao Paulo Biennale (2002). Eriksson is represented by KROME Gallery, Berlin and NON Gallery, Istanbul.

15.02.13 - 14.04.13

Ulla von Brandenburg

Opening: Friday 15 February 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Shadowplay', 2012.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Shadowplay', 2012.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque. Filmstill 'Spiegellied I & II (Mirrorsong I & II)', 2012. Courtesy of the artist.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque. Filmstill 'Spiegellied I & II (Mirrorsong I & II)', 2012. Courtesy of the artist.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Gleich Gleich Gleich

With Gleich Gleich Gleich, KIOSK presents the first Belgian solo show by artist Ulla von Brandenburg (Karlsruhe, 1974, currently based in Paris). Von Brandenburg’s artistic practice is a visualization of the tensions between reality and fiction, visitor and actor, subject and object. Hallucination, mirror images and illusion influence the way we look and von Brandenburg’s theatrical style continually responds to this.

The artist starts from complex story lines, which she interweaves with ritual acts, historical references and elements from contemporary popular culture. Inspirations drawn from baroque theatre, German romanticism, trompe-l’oeil, literature and the occult come together in spatial installations consisting of coloured textile, theatre backdrops, watercolours, murals and film pieces. These elements are all specifically created and staged for the exhibition space concerned, resulting in unique scenographies and immersive experiences.

KIOSK presents Ulla von Brandenburg with the opportunity to bring together all aspects of her diverse oeuvre in a single comprehensive presentation. The exhibition combines two recent video works with an installation specifically conceived for the space.

KIOSK’s central dome room takes on the guise of a circular amphitheatre: wooden stands encircle the space and become the setting for the film Shadowplay (2012). This work, inspired by the classical nineteenth-century French shadow play, highlights the existential role of the actor and revolves around the dualist point where the actor as a subject is taken over by the fiction of the part. Fascinations like the deconstruction of theatrical conventions, the strategy of the artificial and the confrontation with the real or represented image are further explored in the second video, Spiegellied (‘Mirror Song’, 2012). For the cabinet rooms von Brandenburg has conceived new textile work that creates the visual illusion of sun-bleached curtains.

Ulla von Brandenburg’s work is featured regularly in international group shows and at important biennials, such as the Biennial of Lyon (2011) and the Venice Biennial (2009). Solo shows of von Brandenburg’s work have been presented at Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2012), Le Plateau-FRAC, Île de France, Paris (2011), Chisenhale, London (2009), CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco (2008), Kunstverein Düsseldorf (2008), Docking Station, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (2008) & Kunsthalle Zürich (2006).

Nr. 6

Author:

The publication appears on the occasion of Ulla von Brandenburg's exhibition ‘Gleich Gleich Gleich’ at KIOSK (16.02.2013 – 14.04.2013).

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07.12.12 - 13.01.13

Jean Bernard Koeman

Opening: Friday 7 December 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.

Observatory Crest

A ‘scenography-as-installation’ by visual artist Jean Bernard Koeman (°1964) and the KIOSK exhibition space are set to engage in a fascinating interaction. The installation is a result of Koeman’s collaboration as a scenographer with dancer/choreographer Koen Augustijnen (Les Ballets C de la B) and actress/director Abke Haring (Toneelhuis). Thematically, it is based on the notion of ‘complicit architecture’ and it contains associative references to Ho Chi Minh’s stilt house, Apollo 13’s ill-fated journey and the form language of Buckminster Fuller.

Observatory Crest, the show’s title, refers to the concept of the exhibition as vantage point: a custom-built hiding place from where the world can be observed and studied. In his research and collaborations, Koeman always works towards proposals for a performative ‘state’ or a temporary ‘situation’. The eventual performance is then directed by the space as a source of energy and as a measure, and apart from some details made in advance, the works are constructed on site.

The scenography at KIOSK combines a number of Koeman’s existing installations with new in situ work. Sculptures in wood and metal mix with photographs, texts and drawings. On this ornamental level a whole series of storylines meet, making for discordant and complex intertextuality. An intuitive and associative path unwinds through the exhibition space on a non-linear time track. Koeman thus effectively transforms KIOSK into an experiential environment where time and space are experienced subjectively. In a subjective mental experience of architecture, the visitor is confronted with a human or rational structure that is capable of expressing and relating emotions and thoughts about façade, conflictive artistic relations, modernism, and the history of art and architecture.

Koeman sublimates socio-political phenomena from reality into abstract, immersive installations. In the margins of influential historical events we also find a series of personal, anecdotal stories in the exhibition. The staged scenes function as sculptural platforms that are occupied at specific moments by human actors, or that materialize from a constellation of tangible materials, architectural forms, and ideas from our cultural history. They are models for reflection that formulate questions about how sculpture can manifest itself, but they are also illustrations of the ways in which society and our gaze function. As such, Koeman explores the boundary between quotation and autonomous poetics in sculpture, and the point where a sculpture attains a state of scalelessness.

Jean Bernard Koeman is a visual artist and curator. Between 1998 and 2003 he was director of the Arts Centre W139 in Amsterdam, where he staged more than 40 exhibitions with young artists. As a visiting professor, he is affiliated with the Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam and MAPS in Sierre, Switzerland. As a scenographer he works for Les Ballets C de la B in Ghent and Toneelhuis in Antwerp.

Observatory Crest is realized with the support of Toneelhuis and the Mondriaan Fund.