29.04.17 - 16.06.17

Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power

Opening: Friday 28 April 2017 - 20:00

Exhibition
"The Great Court," at the opening ceremony of the World Conference on the UN Decade for Women, University of Nairobi, Kenya, 1985. From “Forum '85 NGO Planning Committee Final Report: Nairobi, Kenya”. © Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College (Northampton, MA).
'Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power', 2017. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
'Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power', 2017. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
'Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power', 2017. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
'Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power', 2017. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
'Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
'Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
'Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
'Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
'Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power', 2017. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
'Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power', 2017. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Saddie Choua, 'Am I The Only One Who Is Like Me?', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
Saddie Choua, 'Am I The Only One Who Is Like Me?', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
Kapwani Kiwanga, 'Tablets', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
Kapwani Kiwanga, 'Tablets', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
Eva Olthof, 'If it were my turn to speak', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
Eva Olthof, 'If it were my turn to speak', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
Study Group for Solidarity and TransActions, 'Prologue', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
Study Group for Solidarity and TransActions, 'Prologue', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
Marwa Arsanios, The exhibited material is part of an ongoing research by Arsanios and Dima Hamadeh on the autonomous Kurdish Women MovementPhoto: Tom Callemin
Marwa Arsanios, The exhibited material is part of an ongoing research by Arsanios and Dima Hamadeh on the autonomous Kurdish Women MovementPhoto: Tom Callemin
Amandine Gay, 'Ouvrir La Voix: les femmes noires se réapproprient la narration', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
Amandine Gay, 'Ouvrir La Voix: les femmes noires se réapproprient la narration', 2017. Photo: Tom Callemin
Saddie Choua, 'I’m sorry I can’t offer you tea, my hands are a little tight', 2014. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Saddie Choua, 'I’m sorry I can’t offer you tea, my hands are a little tight', 2014. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Françoise Dasques, 'La conférence
 des femmes - Nairobi 1985', 1985. Photo: Tom Callemin
Françoise Dasques, 'La conférence des femmes - Nairobi 1985', 1985. Photo: Tom Callemin

Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power combines an exhibition with a public program of lectures, panel discussions, performances and screenings to present stories from the history of feminist struggle. Issues of race, gender and class are covered from a so-called intersectional perspective, an approach that works to bring to the fore the combinations of discriminatory practices and the dynamics they engender. The project’s title refers to the 2009 lecture of the same name by Gloria Wekker, renowned Surinamese-Dutch scholar with an established reputation within the transnational and Black European feminist discourse.

Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power wishes to extend its scope beyond Western, white feminism and to trace the beginnings of a transnational and intersectional perspective in Belgian feminism and beyond. The project’s starting point was the Ghent Royal Academy of Fine Arts and its first (and thus far sole) female head Chantal De Smet, who held the position from 1989 to 1996. In the early 1970s, De Smet was a central character in the Ghent Dolle Minas, one of the first initiatives of the second feminist wave in Flanders. She was also one of the driving forces behind the Belgian Angela Davis Committee.

It was the second feminist wave that pushed the United Nations to taking measures to improve the position of women, resulting in the UN declaring the period 1976-1985 the decade of the woman and the organisation of women’s conferences in Mexico City (1975), Copenhagen (1980) and Nairobi (1985). FORUM ’85, the alternative conference of women’s movements and non-governmental organizations taking place alongside the official UN conference in Nairobi was a key moment in the history of transnational feminism. Attended by 14,000 women, activists and feminists from mainly non-Western countries, it was the first occasion of that scale to stage worldwide encounters and exchanges of ideas.

Documents from public archives that provide insight in these historical and local contexts make up the backbone of the exhibition. In addition, visual artists Marwa Arsanios, Saddie Choua, Amandine Gay, Kapwani Kiwanga, Ato Malinda, Eva Olthof and collective Study Group for Solidarity and TransActions were invited to make new work, connecting with these archives and themes and approach them from a postcolonial, transnational or politically emancipatory context. They offer new critical perspectives on history and in turn help to shape the guise of another new wave of feminism.

The public program wishes to think about how feminism can radically rethink notions such as class, gender and race from a postcolonial perspective. The program starts with a screening of Françoise Dasques’ film La conférence des femmes – Naïrobi (1985) about FORUM ’85, followed by a conversation between Paola Bacchetta (professor of Gender and Women’s Studies, University of California, Berkeley) and French political scientist Françoise Vergès.

Show Me Your Archive and I Will Tell You Who is in Power is organized by KIOSK and KASK / School of Arts Ghent in the context of The Uses of Art – The Legacy of 1848 and 1989, a project initiated by the museum confederation L’Internationale with the support of the Culture Programme of the European Union. The project is curated by Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, Wim Waelput and assistant curator Rachelle Dufour.

In cooperation with Amsab-
ISG, AVG-Carhif and Sophia asbl/vzw.

11.02.17 - 16.04.17

Shilpa Gupta

Opening: Friday 10 February 2017 - 20:00

Exhibition
Shilpa Gupta, ‘1:444557’, steel, brass plate (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘1:444557’, steel, brass plate (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘1:444557’, steel, brass plate (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘1:444557’, steel, brass plate (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘24:00:01’, motion flapboard (2010-12). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘24:00:01’, motion flapboard (2010-12). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘1:2138’, vitrine, brass plate, shredded garment (2017) & ‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘1:2138’, vitrine, brass plate, shredded garment (2017) & ‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘1:2138’, vitrine, brass plate, shredded garment (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘1:2138’, vitrine, brass plate, shredded garment (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘1:2138’, vitrine, brass plate, shredded garment (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘1:2138’, vitrine, brass plate, shredded garment (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘1:2138’, vitrine, brass plate, shredded garment (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘1:2138’, vitrine, brass plate, shredded garment (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta,‘Untitled’, paper, pigment from marijuana, growing in vicinity of checkpoint (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Unnoticed’, photographs of border sky, fragmented spare motor parts (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Song of the Ground’, mechanical installation, borderland river stones (2017) & ‘Map Tracing # 1 – BE’, copper pipe (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Song of the Ground’, mechanical installation, borderland river stones (2017) & ‘Map Tracing # 1 – BE’, copper pipe (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Map Tracing # 1 – BE’, copper pipe (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Map Tracing # 1 – BE’, copper pipe (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Song of the Ground’, mechanical installation, borderland river stones (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Song of the Ground’, mechanical installation, borderland river stones (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Song of the Ground’, mechanical installation, borderland river stones (2017). Photo Tom Callemin
Shilpa Gupta, ‘Song of the Ground’, mechanical installation, borderland river stones (2017). Photo Tom Callemin

Indian artist Shilpa Gupta presents the solo exhibition Drawing in the Dark. The title refers to the clandestine movements and practices in borderlands, and to the metaphor of the line or threshold that links several of the works on display here. The show is part of Gupta’s ongoing investigation into interrelations between structures, specifically those of the state and the individual, and their rescaling as encountered at, what is both frontier and periphery. Continuing her six years of ongoing research – specifically in the borderlands of India and Bangladesh – this new series of works is an extension of the My East is Your West project she developed for the 2015 Venice Biennale. In late 2016 Gupta returned to parts around the border fence that India is building, encircling its neighbor Bangladesh, and that is notorious for being the world’s longest separation barrier under construction between two nation states. However, says the artist, “daily life in the borderland belies state intentions and the flows of people and goods continue, prompted by historical and social affinities, geographical continuity and economic imperative.”

Accompanying the central sculpture 24:00:01 (motion flapboard, 2010-2012) is a series of new pieces that can be seen as a collection of clandestine stories. The drawings, photos and sculptures draw a picture of the subversive, illegal and informal stream of goods, people and desires. An object wound with a shredded Dhakai Jamdani saree (traditional clothing), drawings made with marijuana and photo collages with spare motor parts carry narratives of unlisted journeys over a meandering map line.

What Gupta’s work aims to provoke in the visitor, rather than a passive aesthetic experience, are questions. She initiates a dialogue on the perception and construction of identity, and on those notions that exercise an influence over these processes: nationality, technology, religion, borders, conflicts, control or censorship: “I am interested in perception and therefore, with how definitions get stretched or trespassed, be it by gender, beliefs, or the notion of a nation. There exists a chasm between the larger construct which seeks singularity, and its own fragment which may not. Markings and measuring, seemingly logical acts, may not necessarily provide solutions” (Shilpa Gupta in Indian Express, 2016).

In the borderlands Gupta evokes with Drawing in the Dark, our apparently rigorous laws reveal themselves as in constant motion and subject to debate. The fringe area is shown as a stretch of no man’s land where practices and narratives develop ‘in the dark’, or as a parallel circuit of goods that operates ‘invisibly’ before the authorities’ eyes. The ‘law’ of each identity is replaced here by a set of conditional rules, freeing up mental and experimental space in which to question ourselves.

The exhibition is a joint production by KIOSK, Bielefelder Kunstverein and Le centre d’art contemporain – la synagogue de Delme.

03.12.16 - 29.01.17

Dorothy Iannone

Opening: Friday 2 December 2016 - 20:00

Exhibition
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Dorothy Iannone, 'Lineage of Love', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin

Lineage of Love

KIOSK presents Lineage of Love, the first Belgian solo exhibition by Dorothy Iannone (°1933, Boston, USA). A self-taught artist focusing on issues of emancipation, sexuality, politics and spiritual awakening, Iannone has been developing a singular body of work for over half a century. From 1967 she lived with Swiss-German artist Dieter Roth for a number of years, starting a thorough intertwining of her personal (and amorous) life with her artistic work. This emphatic autobiographical and narrative aspect of her work is expressed in paintings, drawings, graphic novels, sculptures, artist’s books, text-based works, collages and photographic works.

The great diversity of all of these media is showcased in Lineage of Love, where earlier works are presented alongside Iannone’s more recent practice. A number of key works, such as the sculpture I Was Thinking of You and the two series of drawings An Icelandic Saga and The Story of Bern, are combined with less familiar works ranging from an early abstract painting, over a series of collages with Japanese paper and gold leaf, to a self-portrait in the shape of a polaroid, and a cooking diary from 1969. With this approach, the exhibition aims to paint the portrait of a versatile artist who has continually been on the move, looking for a symbiosis between art and her personal narratives, encounters, and passions.

In the 1960s, Iannone produced abstract expressionist works, yet from the 1970s onwards, she has developed in a more figurative direction with herself, her partner, and what she calls ‘ecstatic unity’ as central subjects. Iannone’s body, depicted as an ornately bejewelled divine Matriarch, becomes entangled with that of her Muse, Dieter Roth. Black lines and colour fields define overwhelming mosaics and two-dimensional tableaus of copulating couples whose male and female parts become interchangeable in the higher union of spiritual oneness. Confident women break free of all restraint and figure in a tale of love, sex, treason and power. The sexual act is emphasized and celebrated, much as it was in Antiquity. The artist’s many travels in Asia and Europe also left traces in her techniques and motifs. The perspectiveless compositions are reminiscent of Japanese woodblock prints, Greek vases or Middle-Eastern erotic paintings; her colourful mosaics and mandala-shapes recall Buddhist, Byzantine or 17th-century Baroque traditions.

Iannone’s work has often been subjected to censorship and has long been neglected. With the turn of the millennium, however, this has gradually changed and she has since exhibited solo shows in such venues as Air de Paris, Paris (2015); Peres Projects, Berlin (2014); Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zürich (2014); Berlinische Galerie, Berlin (2014); New Museum, New York (2009) and Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2006).

24.09.16 - 20.11.16

Jérémie Gindre

Exhibition
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Rachel Gruijters
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Jérémie Gindre, 'Kamp Kataloog', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin

Kamp Kataloog

With ‘Kamp Kataloog’, KIOSK presents the first Belgian solo exhibition of Swiss artist and author Jérémie Gindre. The exhibition takes in changing settings and was conceived in a series of three episodes: the first of these took place in the summer of 2015 at the Centre d’art contemporain La Criée in Rennes, the second ‘campsite’ was erected in the spring of 2016 at La Kunsthalle in Mulhouse, and this fall, the series concludes with episode three at KIOSK. Like a panoramic landscape, these temporary ‘camps’ evolve with the seasons to develop numerous new stories along the way. Depending on the exhibition space and the season, the shows bring together a different combination of sculptures, drawings, and texts. In line with that concept, Gindre has rendered the title of the exhibition and book project, ‘Camp Catalogue’, in a Dutch-language version.

The show starts from our contact with nature and the way in which we attempt to shape, comprehend, and limit it. Gindre presents us with a poetic yet systematic study of the formal language of camping sites and their surroundings — fences, rivers, birds and beehives, but also that which takes place in the ground below. This results in a catalogue of landscape types that is not exhaustive or scientific in nature, but is primarily aimed at stirring the reader’s memory and imagination.

Coinciding with the exhibition is the publication of Jérémie Gindre’s artist’s book ‘Camp Catalogue’. The book includes the drawings and texts from the exhibitions, and is published by Lendroit éditions in cooperation with La Criée, Rennes, La Kunsthalle, Mulhouse and KIOSK, Ghent.

Jérémie Gindre is the author of about twelve books, including novels, short stories, essays, diaries, visual books, and more. These books deal with history, geography, conceptual art, neuro science, archaeology, and tourism, and the author playfully blends all of these disciplines. Gindre’s work has been exhibited at Kunsthaus Baselland, Muttenz (Switzerland); Kunstmuseum Thun (Switzerland); Museo de Arte Moderno, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kunsthalle Fri-Art, Fribourg (Switzerland); La Criée centre d’art contemporain, Rennes (France) and La Kunsthalle, Mulhouse (France).

Camp Catalog

Author: Jérémie Gindre

12€ (collector's edition: 16€)

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23.04.16 - 12.06.16

Peter Wächtler

Opening: Friday 22 April 2016 - 20:00

Exhibition
(c) Peter Wächtler
(c) Peter Wächtler
Peter Wächtler, still from 'Untitled', video, 2014
Peter Wächtler, still from 'Untitled', video, 2014
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, still from 'Untitled', video, 2014
Peter Wächtler, still from 'Untitled', video, 2014
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Peter Wächtler, '9', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin

9

Peter Wächtler (1979, Hannover) illustrates, writes, makes sculptures and creates sound, animation and video art. Wächtler sets narrative techniques into play: his texts set the tone and function as a framework for his diverse body of work. The complex, fantastical storylines create an atmosphere filled with humor, satire and alienation, and his scenarios take the shape of book illustrations, simple animations, prose, voiceovers or storyboards. Wächtler plays with the language and imagery of pop culture, such as that typically encountered in bestsellers, page-turners, tearjerkers and blockbusters. He adapts these genres’ formal characteristics, while simultaneously undermining them in their initial educational, entertaining or empathic functions.

Wächtler’s stories are first-person narratives, but he never divulges whether and in what measure his characters are based on pure fiction, actual memories or everyday anecdotes. To a certain extent we can identify ourselves with the figures he so poetically gives life to. At the same time, however, their eccentricity, excessive liveliness and deadpan humor keep us at a safe distance. Their communication is limited and they feel vulnerable or undervalued. They behave obstructively, passively or outlandish.

Following the strategy of negation, Wächtler’s exhibition at KIOSK is entitled 9. For this installation he went in search of a unique way to occupy the exhibition space, a way that is not in the least concerned with adhering to current museological and architectural codes.

Peter Wächtler lives and works in Brussels and Berlin. He has exhibited solo at, among others, The Renaissance Society, Chicago (2016); Westfälischer Kunstverein, Münster (2014); Reena Spaulings, New York (2014); dépendance gallery, Brussels (2013); Kunstverein Hildesheim (2013); Ludlow 38, New York (2013); Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2013). Wächtler took part in recent group exhibitions such as: 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience, New Museum, New York (2015); the Liverpool Biennial (2014); Meanwhile…Suddenly and Then, Lyon Biennale (2013); Pride Goes Before a Fall – Beware of a Holy Whore, Artists Space, New York (2013); Un-Scene II, Wiels, Brussels (2012); Melanchotopia, Witte de With, Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2011). Sternberg Press published a collection of Wächtler’s texts in 2013, entitled Come On.

13.02.16 - 10.04.16

Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel

Exhibition
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin
Daniel Dewar & Grégory Gicquel, 'Digitalis', 2016. Photo: Tom Callemin

Digitalis

At KIOSK, British-French artist duo Daniel Dewar and Grégory Gicquel bring together several new series of sculptures under the title Digitalis.

In their sculptural practice, the artists use a wide array of techniques, including woodcarving, weaving, ceramics and stone dressing. They employ this autodidactic knowledge of traditional methods of production in the creation of unique, handcrafted objects. This means that a sculpture on display is often the result of a long and labour-intensive process in which the material is carefully selected, researched and manipulated.

This is also the case for the sculptures that are created for Digitalis. The exhibition’s title uses the botanical name for foxgloves; ‘digitalis’ meaning ‘of the finger’, a reference to the flower’s shape. Both the title and the works on display are concerned with the concept of the touch, or stroke; in the shape of a unique fingerprint or as a digital, serial gesture. The purple Digitalis flower, for instance, reappears as a floral motif in the details of a new series of benches hand-made by the artists from cypress wood. The cushions for the seats are adorned with digital embroidery.

Dewar and Gicquel’s choice for obsolete manual techniques should not, however, be interpreted as a nostalgic reflex concerning forgotten traditions, or as a critical stand on standardization and uniformity in an industrialized world. Techniques and media are not a work’s final goals. On the contrary, most often they function as starting points for an investigation of the narrative potential, as references for the subject to freely revolve around.

The diminished relevance or anachronistic nature of, in this case, embroidery and the use of a chisel and mechanic wood cutter is seen by the artists themselves as sculptural surplus value. A block of wood starts with the potential to take on any narrative and sculptural form, but it is simultaneously inherent in the creative process that this starting material will only lead to a single sculptural ‘appearance’. Dewar and Gicquel take great pleasure in the journey towards this appearance, in manipulating techniques or setting a particular material in motion and, curiously yet patiently, watching the emergence of a sculptural image. Their take on traditional techniques does not require the rules to be followed strictly; no, new rules are invented along the way. This idea is strikingly embodied in the sofa-pieces: they do not function as perfectly finished practical objects, but as a series of unique sculptures with delicate nuances in material, colour, and size.

Courtesy: Miet Warlop
Courtesy: Miet Warlop
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', during the opening night November 27th, 2015. Photo Pauline Niks
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', during the opening night November 27th, 2015. Photo Pauline Niks
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', during the opening night November 27th, 2015. Photo Pauline Niks
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', during the opening night November 27th, 2015. Photo Pauline Niks
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', during the opening night November 27th, 2015. Photo Pauline Niks
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', during the opening night November 27th, 2015. Photo Pauline Niks
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', during the opening night November 27th, 2015. Photo Pauline Niks
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', during the opening night November 27th, 2015. Photo Pauline Niks
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', during the opening night November 27th, 2015. Photo Pauline Niks
Miet Warlop, 'Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm', during the opening night November 27th, 2015. Photo Pauline Niks

Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm

KIOSK presents two new exhibitions with works by Belgian artists Miet Warlop (1978) and Nel Aerts (1987). Both artists create universes that, in various guises and with different media, leave an immediate, poetic impression. Once immersed in them, the visitor will smile and grin at their ambiguous image worlds, before being left, moved and deserted.

Miet Warlop creates performances, actions and public interventions that stand midway between absurdist theatre and autonomous ‘tableaux vivants’. Warlop creates a visual language in between theatre, dance, and exhibition and freely plays these disciplines off against each other.

Titled Crumbling Down the Circle of My Iconoclasm, Warlop’s show at KIOSK presents an installation in which smaller spatial arrangements of objects, props, gestures and performers interact and set out an ever-changing choreography within an exhibition’s set chronology. Like a contemporary iconoclast, Warlop takes over the dome room to visualize her interpretation of the Greek notions of eikon (representation) and klastès (breaker): a process of simultaneous creation and destruction.

In Warlop’s visual universe, all elements are interconnected in an infinitely spinning loop of references that may take the form of a scratch on a record, a plaster cymbal, or a skirt-shaped object rolling in circles on the floor. The different objects are activated during brief interventions, unannounced temporary sculptural installations. The appearance of a new image inevitably coincides with the disappearance or crumbling of other images. Every action or movement adds a visual or auditory mark to the overall picture, resonating through and with the dome room.

28.11.15 - 31.01.16

Nel Aerts

Exhibition
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', photo by Vic Aerts, 1990.
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', photo by Vic Aerts, 1990.
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin
Nel Aerts, 'Billenkoek', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin

Billenkoek

KIOSK presents two new exhibitions with works by Belgian artists Nel Aerts (1987) and Miet Warlop (1978). Both artists create universes that, in various guises and with different media, leave an immediate, poetic impression. Once immersed in them, the visitor will smile and grin at their ambiguous image worlds, before being left, moved and deserted.

Nel Aerts also freely and intuitively moves between different media such as painting, drawing, collage, performance, and sculpture. Over the last couple of years, a growing focus on the portrait can be discerned in her work, resulting on works on paper and wooden panels.

For the occasion of her show Billenkoek, Aerts has assembled a new, motley crowd of abstracted, posing subjects and characters that refer to popular culture, her immediate everyday surroundings and the artist herself. The (self) portraits are tragicomic in the contrasts they evoke. They can be sad or funny, extraverted or inward-looking, deliberately or playfully crawled out of the wood or arisen from the imagination as a drawing, but invariably they are introspective and unassuming.

A selection of older and new paintings, and a new series of about sixty drawings interact with the KIOSK spaces in a number of installation interventions. The impression one gets is that of a portrait gallery with walls, windows, and floor covered with autonomous pieces, making the drawn space and the exhibition space flow into each other.

Hundred Zundert

Author: Grete Simkuté

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19.09.15 - 15.11.15

Leonor Antunes

Exhibition
Courtesy: New Museum, New York. Photo: Maris Hutchinson/EPW
Courtesy: New Museum, New York. Photo: Maris Hutchinson/EPW
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Leonor Antunes, 'I Stand Like A Mirror Before You', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.

I Stand Like a Mirror Before You

I Stand Like a Mirror Before You is the first Belgian solo exhibition by Leonor Antunes. For the occasion, the artist, who was born in Portugal and currently resides in Berlin, has created an installation that takes in the entire KIOSK space and incorporates a number of new works.

Antunes’ site-specific sculptures echo both their immediate surroundings and the history of 20th-century architecture, art, and design. The artist’s interest in traditional craftsmanship is revealed in her use of natural materials such as wood, bamboo, leather, copper and rope.

At KIOSK, these materials are converted into freestanding, spatial demarcations, or knotted and folded according to traditional techniques into hanging net and grid structures. The works’ forms and techniques are informed by the visual languages of Swedish furniture designer Greta Grossman and American filmmaker and choreographer Maya Deren. Other sources of inspiration are the weavings of textile artists such as Anni Albers and Lenore Tawney. Antunes unravels the principles of construction underlying their rational designs and makes an abstraction of reality. In the course of this manual creative process, a reduced, personalized form emerges which she places in front of the viewer like a mirror.

Once the artist has fathomed and shaped a material’s physical and aesthetic qualities, its particular cultural history and that of its makers, she relates this material to the exhibition space. The space’s dimensions and proportions are brought into consideration to come to a composition that balances between a deliberately ordered pattern and a random tangle of textures, structures and surfaces, between hiding and revealing.

I Stand Like a Mirror Before You examines human interaction with spaces and surfaces. The seemingly carelessly sagging textiles attempt to assimilate to their surroundings. The works’ surfaces are mat, reflective or transparent, and mirror each other. Together, they sketch out a choreography of an infinite number of possible passages and vistas. In this web and/or grid-shaped installation, we are not presented with a single path to follow, not shown a clear reflection in the mirror.

The exhibition I Stand Like a Mirror Before You was realized in cooperation with the New Museum, New York, where a different version of it was on view earlier (24.06.2015 – 06.09.2015).

Leonor Antunes’ most recent solo exhibitions were presented at Pérez Art Museum Miami (2014), Kunsthalle Basel (2013), Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (2013), and Kunstverein Harburger Bahnhof, Hamburg (2012). Her work has also been included in a number of international group exhibitions, including the 12th Sharjah Biennial, UAE (2015), and the 8th Berlin Biennial (2014), and has recently been exhibited in venues such as the Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York (2014), Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2014), CNEAI, Chatou, France (2013), and MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge (2012). Antunes will be the subject of solo exhibitions at CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux (2015), Tensta konsthall, Stockholm (2016), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2016), and Museo Tamayo, Mexico City (2017).

26.04.15 - 14.06.15

Christian Falsnaes

Exhibition
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', sculpture, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', sculpture, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, still from 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', video/performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', sculpture, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', sculpture, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', sculpture, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Front (Kareth Schaffer)', sculpture, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'Time/Line/Movement
Christian Falsnaes, 'Time/Line/Movement", performance, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'The Title Is Your Name', performance, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'The Title Is Your Name', performance, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'The Title Is Your Name', performance, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'The Title Is Your Name', performance, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'The Title Is Your Name', performance, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'The Title Is Your Name', performance, 2015. Photo Tom Callemin.
Christian Falsnaes, 'The Title Is Your Name', performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, 'The Title Is Your Name', performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, 'The Title Is Your Name', performance, 2015.
Christian Falsnaes, 'The Title Is Your Name', performance, 2015.

Front (Kareth Schaffer)

With Front (Kareth Schaffer), KIOSK presents the first Belgian solo show by Danish artist Christian Falsnaes (1980, Copenhagen; currently based in Berlin).

Performance is at the heart of Falsnaes’ work: his actions are presented live or filmed, with or without an audience, and with man as study object and material. To Falsnaes, performance is the medium most closely approaching the Gesamtkunstwerk, as it can incorporate any other medium and is presented live. The artist employs a multitude of visual forms, including painting, video, music and dance, to develop theatrical, often absurd situations with the active participation of the audience. Recurrent themes are the relations between the individual and the group, and those between the artist and his audience.

Falsnaes engages in a thorough, physical exploration of a wide range of issues of social codes, group dynamics, power relations, authorship, gender roles and more. One of the forms this exploration has crystallized in, are the series of unannounced performances in which the artist directed the audience in several roles: from didactic artist to actor, from authoritarian leader to entertainer, clown, hooligan, and outcast. Increasingly, however, Falsnaes develops performative formats in which he himself is not physically present, making use of an interactive app, telephone connection, or stand-in. In other instances, he examines how the particular situation of a performance may facilitate the creation of a video piece. The video does not function as a documentation of the action then, but as an autonomous piece that is realized with the help of a script and camera team.

In line with these recent developments, Falsnaes’ exhibition at KIOSK, Front (Kareth Schaffer) will also materialize gradually: he will present three performance pieces in which existing actions are reinterpreted, thus creating new work on the spot. People will be asked to perform scripts written by the artist, focusing on issues of authorship, participation, and the artist’s identity. The interactive installation The Title Is Your Name will open up the performative potential of looking at art, and will generate a series of new, online video pieces.

On the occasion of his recent nomination for the Preis der Nationalgalerie, Christian Falsnaes will exhibit at the Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin in Fall 2015. Until May 3rd of this year, his solo show Available can be seen at Kunstverein Braunschweig. Recently, he has also had solo exhibitions at Bielefelder Kunstverein, Bielefeld (2015); PSM, Berlin (2014); Art Basel Statements, Art 45 Basel (2014); KW Institute of Contemporary Art, Berlin (2013); and DREI, Cologne (2013).

The exhibition was organized in collaboration with Bielefelder Kunstverein.