Ulla von Brandenburg

Nr. 6

Editor: Ulla von Brandenburg
Year: 2013

Pages: 14
Size: 35 x 48 cm
Price: 4€
Shipping cost: Belgium 2€ / Europe 5€ / Rest of the world 6€

Nr. 6, Ulla von Brandenburg, 2013, 35 x 48 cm, 14, 4€, Belgium 2€ / Europe 5€ / Rest of the world 6€

Nr. 6

‘Nr. 6′ is a newspaper edition conceived for Ulla von Brandenburg’s exhibition ‘Gleich Gleich Gleich’ at KIOSK (16.02.2013 – 14.04.2013).
The newspaper reflects the artist’s sources of inspiration. With the depiction of different kinds of quilts the principles of montage and association becomes clear.

Publication
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26.01.14—16:00

Zachary Formwalt

Film screening
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Zachary Formwalt, 'In Place of Capital', 2009 & 'At Face Value', 2008, film screening, 26.01.2013.
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Zachary Formwalt, 'In Place of Capital', 2009 & 'At Face Value', 2008, film screening, 26.01.2013.

Zachary Formwalt

KIOSK organizes a new year’s welcoming and a guided tour of the work of Zachary Formwalt and Pratchaya Phinthong by curator Wim Waelput. Followed by a selection of Formwalt’s film work at KASKcinema, introduced by the artist: ‘In Place of Capital’, 2009, 24’30” & ‘At Face Value’, 2008, 22’30”.

In collaboration with Kaskcinema.

Film screening
29.11.13 - 26.01.14

Pratchaya Phinthong

Opening: Friday 29 November 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Pratchaya Phinthong, 'A propsal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)', 2014. Photo Tom Callemin.

A proposal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process)

KIOSK presents a duo exhibition featuring the work of Thai artist Pratchaya Phinthong (1974, currently based in Bangkok) and American artist Zachary Formwalt (1979, currently based in Amsterdam). The practices of these two artists share an outspoken discursive and essayistic quality. In their research they reveal connections between historical, social and political events and search for ways to express social and economic processes that are less visible.

Pratchaya Phinthong initiates a new project dealing with methane hydrate or ‘burning ice’ at KIOSK. The artist is fascinated by the poetic image of burning ice, and also by its metaphorical potential in light of important current geostrategic and social issues such as energy, the economy, and ecology. The sedimentary deposits of methane hydrate are estimated to contain anywhere between two and ten times the amount of methane of the entire known reserves of natural gas. As such, they form a potentially crucial future source of fossil fuel. Phinthong deploys this thought-provoking idea as a conceptual tool for organizing his show A proposal to set CH4 · 5.75H2O on fire (work in process).

Pratchaya Phinthong has had solo exhibitions presented at places such as Chisenhale Gallery, London (2013); Lothringer13_Halle, Munich (2013); gb agency, Paris (2012); Centre d’Art Contemporain, Rennes (2012); Galeria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Bergamo (2011) and the Centre d’art contemporain, Brétigny (2010). Occasions and venues where he has recently participated in group shows include MUMOK, Vienna (2013); Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2013); dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel; New Museum Triennial, New York (2012); Taipei Biennial, Taiwan (2012); Kadist Art Foundation, Paris (2011) and Kunsthalle Basel (2011).

29.11.13 - 26.01.14

Zachary Formwalt

Opening: Friday 29 November 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin. Film still 'In Light of the Arc', 2013-2014. Courtesy of the artist.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin. Film still 'In Light of the Arc', 2013-2014. Courtesy of the artist.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.
Zachary Formwalt, 'A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject', 2013-2014. Photo Tom Callemin.

A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject

KIOSK presents a duo exhibition featuring the work of American artist Zachary Formwalt (1979, currently based in Amsterdam) and Thai artist Pratchaya Phinthong (1974, currently based in Bangkok). The practices of these two artists share an outspoken discursive and essayistic quality. In their research they reveal connections between historical, social and political events and search for ways to express social and economic processes that are less visible.

Zachary Formwalt’s show A way of removing an element that interferes with the subject is conceived as a three-part video and photo series dealing with our contemporary global economy. In his work Formwalt repeatedly returns to the metaphorical image of the stock exchange and the inability to visualize the perpetually circulating flows of capital in the world of finance. The first part of this show, the video Unsupported Transit (2011), focuses on the construction site of the new stock exchange in the Chinese city of Shenzhen, designed by Rem Koolhaas’s Office for Metropolitan Architecture. Shenzhen has a special status as an economic zone where the authorities allow the system of the free market to run its course. While Unsupported Transit merely scans the outside of the building, the second piece in the series shows the interior of the finished stock exchange. The video diptych In Light of the Arc (2013) registers the materialization of a place that is paradoxically marked by an increasing dematerialization. As the stock trade is now entirely controlled by IT and advanced logarithms the trade floor with its iconic golden bell has come to serve a merely ceremonial function. The third part of the series turns to architect Hendrik Petrus Berlage’s stock exchange in Amsterdam. Here Formwalt focuses on the question of how Berlage was capable of matching his idealistic, socialist ideas with the capitalist function of the building. This final part of the series is presented here as ongoing research in photographs and documents; the definitive video piece will be finished in the course of 2014.

The exhibition by Zachary Formwalt was made possible with the support of the Mondriaan Fund.

Zachary Formwalt has presented his work in solo shows in such venues as D+T Project, Brussels (2013); ar/ge kunst Galerie Museum, Bolzano (2011); Casco—Office for Art, Design and Theory, Utrecht (2010); Wexner Center for the Arts: The Box, Columbus, Ohio (2010); Kunsthalle Basel (2009); Elder Gallery, Lincoln (2006) and the Rooseum Center for Contemporary Art, Malmö (2005). He has also participated in film festivals and group shows such as the International Film Festival Rotterdam (2013); Liquid Assets at Steirischer Herbst, Graz (2013); Image Employment at MoMA PS1, New York (2013) and the European Media Art Festival in Osnabrück (2013). In 2012 Formwalt won the Illy Prize in Rotterdam.

27.09.13 - 17.11.13

Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu

Opening: Friday 27 September 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Courtesy Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren.
Courtesy Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection André Magnin, Paris.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection André Magnin, Paris.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection Pierre Loos, Brussels.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection Pierre Loos, Brussels.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin

Patterns for (Re)cognition

KIOSK presents the duo show Patterns for (re)cognition, with works by Belgian artist Vincent Meessen (1971, Baltimore, US) and Congolese artist Tshyela Ntendu (ca. 1890 – ca. 1950, Congo). The exhibition makes unexpected connections between the various uses of abstraction in psychology, art and design.

During his current research on colonial psychology, Vincent Meessen was intrigued by the relation between the formal abstraction of certain cognitive tests and Western geometrical abstract art. By displaying a curated section of abstract paintings from the late 1920s by one of the two so-called first modern Congolese artists, the pioneer Tshyela Ntendu (aka Djilatendo), Meessen proposes a ‘constructivist scenario’ that problematizes the Western narrative of abstraction in regard to so-called primitive ornament.

The title, Patterns for (re)cognition, refers to the jargon of cognitive psychology and in particular to the tests designed to measure the capacity of our brain for abstraction and memory; mental operations that are based on recognition and identification of recurrent impulses (signs, sounds, forms, patterns, letters, faces …).

Claudia Wieser

Furniture

Author: Liene Aerts, Alexander Garcia Düttmann, Zoë Gray, Wim Waelput
Editor: KIOSK
Year: 2013

Pages: 32
Size: 19 x 25 cm
Price: 13€
Shipping cost: Belgium 2€ / Europe 5€ / Rest of the world 6€

Furniture, KIOSK, 2013, 19 x 25 cm, 32, 13€, Belgium 2€ / Europe 5€ / Rest of the world 6€

Furniture

The publication appears on the occasion of Claudia Wieser’s exhibition 'Furniture' at KIOSK (06.10.2012 – 18.11.2012).

The title refers directly at issues that lie at the very heart of Wieser’s work: what is the status of sculptures that were designed as objects? The artist’s body of work is built around this question and explores the boundaries between autonomous and applied art. The exhibition brought together an ensemble of drawings, ceramic and wooden sculptures, and a spatial collage, instigating a dialogue between them and explicitly relating them to the architectural context of the exhibition space.

Graphic design by Boy Vereecken.

Publication
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26.04.13 - 16.06.13

Kelly Schacht

Opening: Friday 27 September 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Laurent Fobe.

It seems economical to make use of a character already in play

KIOSK presents an exhibition that combines work by Belgian artist Kelly Schacht and Swedish artist Annika Eriksson.
Kelly Schacht responds to the exhibition space and Annika Eriksson’s work. For the duration of her show It seems economical to make use of a character already in play the empty rooms will be activated by temporary interventions or ‘characters’ whose performative presence will resound in the human absence emphasized by Eriksson. This approach is based in the uncertain and in coincidence: an openness that is prerequisite for Schacht’s ongoing research into the perception and practice of exhibiting and the dynamic space in which it takes place. By way of theatrical constructions, Schacht stages a fragmented dialogue between space and matter, illusion and reality.

In ‘It seems economical to make use of a character already in play’ this approach results in a scenario, tailored to the exhibition space, that will unfold over the course of the seven weeks of the exhibition. Like a postscript, this minimal scenography will address what is hidden and appeal to the visitors’ imagination.

Both artists – each grounded in their respective generations – work with the same kind of ideas in presentations that rely on the staged and the imaginary, and on the factors of time, language, the viewer and social interaction. With their cinematographic constructions and minimal interventions they introduce the audience into a fragmented narrative dimension. Where Eriksson mainly directs the exhibition space through the use of film, Schacht manipulates it with the aid of objects and people. Both narrative styles make use of the reversal of time and language, giving their scenarios an aura both of recognition and of the indefinable, like blind spots or ambiguous vacuums in space and time.

Kelly Schacht received the 2011 Young Belgian Painters Award and has showed her work at the Gwangju Biennial (2012); De Vleeshal, Middelburg (2011); Hoet Bekaert Gallery, Ghent; Cultuurcentrum Strombeek, Grimbergen; Coupe de ville, Sint-Niklaas (2010); Netwerk – Centre for Contemporary Art (2008); and in Coming People in S.M.A.K, Ghent (2006), among others. She is represented by Meessen De Clercq, Brussels.

26.04.13 - 16.06.13

Annika Eriksson

Opening: Friday 26 April 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.

I am the dog that was always here (loop)

KIOSK presents an exhibition that combines work by Swedish artist Annika Eriksson and Belgian artist Kelly Schacht.
With ‘I am the dog that was always here (loop)’, KIOSK presents the first exhibition in Belgium by Annika Eriksson. Eriksson bases her work in scenarios where the perception of time, structures of power, and once acclaimed social visions are called into question. Strategically, she plays with debates around the public realm and structures that regulate it, revealing urban changes and how this is subject to unexpected political appropriations and inversions.

Eriksson’s works in the exhibition engages with questions of time, its documented forms, and its reversal. Throughout the rooms, Eriksson sets up a number of possible scenarios in video works and three-dimensional interventions that include photographs, light boxes and panes of glass – extended elements of the film in space. The central piece of the presentation is the new video installation in the hemicycle room called I am the dog that was always here (loop) (2013). The video, set in the outskirts of Istanbul, focuses on moments of transition and marginalised experiences of time, seen through the lens of a street dog. Having been moved by the authorities to peripheral pockets and no man’s lands outside the expanding city, the dogs are continuously moving along lines of gentrification and corporate city making. Through looping and repetition, Eriksson relates this process to an experience of time: exploring the present as a complex gap between past and future, one in which an increasing process of erasure, spurred on by a shrinking public realm, also removes other registers of being and seeing.

Annika Eriksson’s I am the dog that was always here (loop) was realized with the support of the Goethe-Institut, Istanbul.

Annika Eriksson has previously presented solo shows in, or was commissioned by: When Attitudes Became Form Become Attitudes, Wattis Institute, San Francisco (2012); Kunstlerhaus Stuttgart (2012); Europe N, GFZK, Leipzig (2011); DAAD Galerie, Berlin (2010); Hayward Gallery, London (2010) and Sheffield Biennale (2008). Eriksson took part in numerous international group shows including Shanghai Biennale and Kiev Biennale (2012), Venice Biennale (2005) and Sao Paulo Biennale (2002). Eriksson is represented by KROME Gallery, Berlin and NON Gallery, Istanbul.

15.02.13 - 14.04.13

Ulla von Brandenburg

Opening: Friday 15 February 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Shadowplay', 2012.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Shadowplay', 2012.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque. Filmstill 'Spiegellied I & II (Mirrorsong I & II)', 2012. Courtesy of the artist.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque. Filmstill 'Spiegellied I & II (Mirrorsong I & II)', 2012. Courtesy of the artist.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Gleich Gleich Gleich

With Gleich Gleich Gleich, KIOSK presents the first Belgian solo show by artist Ulla von Brandenburg (Karlsruhe, 1974, currently based in Paris). Von Brandenburg’s artistic practice is a visualization of the tensions between reality and fiction, visitor and actor, subject and object. Hallucination, mirror images and illusion influence the way we look and von Brandenburg’s theatrical style continually responds to this.

The artist starts from complex story lines, which she interweaves with ritual acts, historical references and elements from contemporary popular culture. Inspirations drawn from baroque theatre, German romanticism, trompe-l’oeil, literature and the occult come together in spatial installations consisting of coloured textile, theatre backdrops, watercolours, murals and film pieces. These elements are all specifically created and staged for the exhibition space concerned, resulting in unique scenographies and immersive experiences.

KIOSK presents Ulla von Brandenburg with the opportunity to bring together all aspects of her diverse oeuvre in a single comprehensive presentation. The exhibition combines two recent video works with an installation specifically conceived for the space.

KIOSK’s central dome room takes on the guise of a circular amphitheatre: wooden stands encircle the space and become the setting for the film Shadowplay (2012). This work, inspired by the classical nineteenth-century French shadow play, highlights the existential role of the actor and revolves around the dualist point where the actor as a subject is taken over by the fiction of the part. Fascinations like the deconstruction of theatrical conventions, the strategy of the artificial and the confrontation with the real or represented image are further explored in the second video, Spiegellied (‘Mirror Song’, 2012). For the cabinet rooms von Brandenburg has conceived new textile work that creates the visual illusion of sun-bleached curtains.

Ulla von Brandenburg’s work is featured regularly in international group shows and at important biennials, such as the Biennial of Lyon (2011) and the Venice Biennial (2009). Solo shows of von Brandenburg’s work have been presented at Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2012), Le Plateau-FRAC, Île de France, Paris (2011), Chisenhale, London (2009), CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco (2008), Kunstverein Düsseldorf (2008), Docking Station, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (2008) & Kunsthalle Zürich (2006).

Nr. 6

Author:

The publication appears on the occasion of Ulla von Brandenburg's exhibition ‘Gleich Gleich Gleich’ at KIOSK (16.02.2013 – 14.04.2013).

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07.12.12 - 13.01.13

Jean Bernard Koeman

Opening: Friday 7 December 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.

Observatory Crest

A ‘scenography-as-installation’ by visual artist Jean Bernard Koeman (°1964) and the KIOSK exhibition space are set to engage in a fascinating interaction. The installation is a result of Koeman’s collaboration as a scenographer with dancer/choreographer Koen Augustijnen (Les Ballets C de la B) and actress/director Abke Haring (Toneelhuis). Thematically, it is based on the notion of ‘complicit architecture’ and it contains associative references to Ho Chi Minh’s stilt house, Apollo 13’s ill-fated journey and the form language of Buckminster Fuller.

Observatory Crest, the show’s title, refers to the concept of the exhibition as vantage point: a custom-built hiding place from where the world can be observed and studied. In his research and collaborations, Koeman always works towards proposals for a performative ‘state’ or a temporary ‘situation’. The eventual performance is then directed by the space as a source of energy and as a measure, and apart from some details made in advance, the works are constructed on site.

The scenography at KIOSK combines a number of Koeman’s existing installations with new in situ work. Sculptures in wood and metal mix with photographs, texts and drawings. On this ornamental level a whole series of storylines meet, making for discordant and complex intertextuality. An intuitive and associative path unwinds through the exhibition space on a non-linear time track. Koeman thus effectively transforms KIOSK into an experiential environment where time and space are experienced subjectively. In a subjective mental experience of architecture, the visitor is confronted with a human or rational structure that is capable of expressing and relating emotions and thoughts about façade, conflictive artistic relations, modernism, and the history of art and architecture.

Koeman sublimates socio-political phenomena from reality into abstract, immersive installations. In the margins of influential historical events we also find a series of personal, anecdotal stories in the exhibition. The staged scenes function as sculptural platforms that are occupied at specific moments by human actors, or that materialize from a constellation of tangible materials, architectural forms, and ideas from our cultural history. They are models for reflection that formulate questions about how sculpture can manifest itself, but they are also illustrations of the ways in which society and our gaze function. As such, Koeman explores the boundary between quotation and autonomous poetics in sculpture, and the point where a sculpture attains a state of scalelessness.

Jean Bernard Koeman is a visual artist and curator. Between 1998 and 2003 he was director of the Arts Centre W139 in Amsterdam, where he staged more than 40 exhibitions with young artists. As a visiting professor, he is affiliated with the Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam and MAPS in Sierre, Switzerland. As a scenographer he works for Les Ballets C de la B in Ghent and Toneelhuis in Antwerp.

Observatory Crest is realized with the support of Toneelhuis and the Mondriaan Fund.

06.10.12 - 18.11.12

Claudia Wieser

Opening: Friday 5 October 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Furniture

KIOSK opens this season with Furniture, a solo show by Berlin-based artist Claudia Wieser (°1973, Freilassing, Germany). In this exhibition, Wieser presents an ensemble of drawings, ceramic and wooden sculptures, and a spatial intervention where the walls of the cabinet rooms are covered with black-and-white prints of interiors, creating an illusionistic perspective.

Wieser’s visual style is marked by an abstraction that is precise and consistent in its form, colour and materials. Like abstract paintings, Wieser’s glazed ceramic tiles consist of geometric patterns. In one case, these are combined to form a large sculpture that is placed in the hemicycle room like a free-standing folding screen. Surrounding the screen are wooden sculptures that are made up of elementary shapes like cylinders, cones and spheres. There is a thematic and pictorial resonance between the spatial intervention and the series of framed drawings and photographs overlaid with geometric compositions in gold leaf and pencil.

These pure studies in form and colour are indebted to the early twentieth-century Bauhaus legacy. Parallel to the teaching methods of this school, Wieser employs craftsmanship and a subjective palette in her attempt to attain an autonomous pictorial aesthetics in which functionality, art and spirituality are tightly interwoven. Her artistic research is based on complex references and universal, stylistic elements from art history. It appropriates the formal rules of early modernist artworks and questions their objectivity, realism and functionality.

This method and the title of the exhibition also point us to the central concern of Wieser’s current work: what is the status of sculptures that have been designed as objects? Wieser’s oeuvre is developed in response to this question and it explores the boundaries between pure and applied forms of art. The artist intensifies the primary relations between form, matter and concept in order to bring out the pure appearance of the image itself. Only then the internal nature of the object can be externalized.

Claudia Wieser has exhibited solo at Sies+Höke Gallery, Düsseldorf (2012), Galleria S.A.L.E.S, Rome (2012), Galerie Ben Kaufmann, Berlin (2011), The Drawing Center, New York (2010), Schauort, Zurich (2010), Galerie Eva Winkeler, Frankfurt (2009), and Kunstverein Oldenburg with Bernd Ribbeck (2009). Recent collective exhibitions in which she participated have been held at Marta Herford / Museum Schloss Moyland (2012), Gerog Kolbe Museum Berlin (2011), Kunstmuseum Stuttgart / Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (2011), Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York (2011) and K21 Kunstsammlungen Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf (2010).

Furniture

Author: Liene Aerts, Alexander Garcia Düttmann, Zoë Gray, Wim Waelput

The publication appears on the occasion of Claudia Wieser’s exhibition 'Furniture' at KIOSK (06.10.2012 – 18.11.2012).

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13.04.12 - 10.06.12

Jan Kempenaers

Opening: Friday 13 April 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

In Search of the Picturesque

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK lets the photographic output of Belgian artist Jan Kempenaers engage with the monumental work of German artist Karsten Födinger. These contrasting practices both start from a landscape context – rural or urban – to subsequently translate them to autonomous aesthetics of the image within a spatial or photographic exhibition frame. As such, it affects our assumptions of recognizable landscape typologies.

As part of his PhD in the visual arts, Jan Kempenaers’ show In Search of the Picturesque presents an overview of the artist’s photographic work of the past years. The body of work represents a visual study of the eighteenth-century notion of the picturesque in the present-day landscape image and its contemporary relevance. The particular picturesque mood evoked by Kempenaers in his photographic oeuvre, strongly manifests itself in his recent ruins pictures and natural landscapes such as inhospitable rock formations and thick forests; images that specifically engage with our conceptualization of the nineteenth-century romantic landscape. Although much less explicitly, the characteristics of the picturesque are also apparent in Kempenaers’ earlier works: these photographic series show massive Yugoslav monuments in deserted natural landscapes, or panoramic urban and industrial landscapes. Whether the pictures frame ‘unspoilt’ wildernesses, a politically charged monument as a modern variant of the ‘romantic’ ruins, or an urban typology, they invariably employ a recognizable, picturesque visual style to represent a specific undeniable contemporary reality.

Jan Kempenaers (1968, Heist-op-den-Berg, Belgium) has recently exhibited solo at Be-Part Waregem (2010), de Garage Mechelen (2010) and Middelheimmuseum Antwerp (2007). His work has been part of numerous group shows, including some at M HKA Antwerp (2012), BOZAR Brussels (2011), S.M.A.K. Ghent (2009) and MARTa Herford (2009).

13.04.12 - 10.06.12

Karsten Födinger

Opening: Friday 13 April 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Void

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK lets the monumental work of German artist Karsten Födinger engage with the photographic output of Belgian artist Jan Kempenaers. These contrasting practices both start from a landscape context – rural or urban – to subsequently translate them to autonomous aesthetics of the image within a spatial or photographic exhibition frame. As such, it affects our assumptions of recognizable landscape typologies.

Karsten Födinger’s massive sculptures and architectural installations take shape in proportion to the exhibition space. His site-specific interventions exude a captivating physical presence. Both in their construction and engineering and in the use of unpolished and functional materials, the sculptures refer to the building sector and its basic industrial typologies.
For his show Void, Födinger realizes a new piece for KIOSK’s central dome room. Födinger constructs a sculpture in ‘rebars’, suggesting the shape of the steel reinforcements of a bridge pier. Födinger filters this element from reality and translates it to a personal, utopian creation process, which precisely sets out from an imaginary functionality, offering up space for a subjective experience. As hinted at by the show’s title, the sculpture not only functions through its self-evident materiality, but just as much through the emptiness that comes with it. The work’s meaning is generated not so much in its formal appearance as in the process of its physical realization.

The exhibition is realised with the generous support of Nv Staalbeton.

Karsten Födinger (1978, Mönchengladbach, Germany) has presented solo exhibitions at Kunst Halle St. Gallen (2012) and Palais de Tokyo Paris (2011). His work has been on display in group shows on numerous occasions, including at Temporäre Kunsthalle Berlijn (2010) and Kunsthaus Baselland Muttenz (2010). Karsten Födinger is represented by RaebervonStenglin in Zürich.

10.02.12 - 25.03.12

Nick Oberthaler

Opening: Friday 10 February 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Eventuality of an Attempt

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK is a double-bill of solo presentations by Austrian artist Nick Oberthaler (°1981, Bad Ischl, based in Brussels) and Dutch artist Sara van der Heide (°1977, Busan, based in Amsterdam).
In their presentations, both artists investigate the possibilities fundamentally inherent in the pictorial medium. Oberthaler mainly focuses on the formal pictorial traditions, prying them open to widen their scope, where Van der Heide examines art-historical dogmas and historical political certainties from a contemporary perspective. The works on display in both cases testify of a specific sensitivity for the incorporeal aspects of painting, watercolours or drawing.

Nick Oberthaler brings his show Eventuality of an Attempt to KIOSK. The attempt in question is one he will undertake to attain a condensed atmospheric experience through the use of mixed techniques on paper, sculpture and the integration of a spatial intervention. But the title also stresses the precariousness of this attempt and the idea that the exhibition’s form will never be fully realized or ‘complete’.
Oberthaler is fully aware of the traditional formal components of which the pictorial representation of a landscape is composed. Horizontal lines slide through several of his abstract geometric designs like so many limitless horizons in landscapes.
The same intention will also gear the treatment of KIOSK’s architectural landscape: the central dome room accommodates four equal spaces created by a cruciform construction of gypsum board. Some of the wall boards function as temporary drawing and painting surfaces, others bear Oberthaler’s pictorial ‘canvases on paper’ and ‘paint drawings’ that are mainly made with Indian ink, wax, pastels, gouache, photographic fragments and collages. These expand onto the mirror-covered wall construction to become three-dimensional temporary landscapes. The work thus explores the material and spatial boundaries of painting. With German romanticism as an undercurrent throughout Eventuality of an Attempt, the artist expresses the yearning to reach a similar level of the sublime through reduction.

10.02.12 - 25.03.12

Sara van der Heide

Opening: Friday 10 February 2012 - 00:00

Exhibition
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK is a double-bill of solo presentations by Dutch artist Sara van der Heide (°1977, Busan, based in Amsterdam) and Austrian artist Nick Oberthaler (°1981, Bad Ischl, based in Brussels) .
In their presentations, both artists investigate the possibilities fundamentally inherent in the pictorial medium. Oberthaler mainly focuses on the formal pictorial traditions, prying them open to widen their scope, where Van der Heide examines art-historical dogmas and historical political certainties from a contemporary perspective. The works on display in both cases testify of a specific sensitivity for the incorporeal aspects of painting, watercolours or drawing.

Sara van der Heide presents a series of twenty watercolours under the title of Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20 (2011). The series is based on a drawing from 1927 by Lena Bergner, a student of Paul Klee’s at the Bauhaus in Weimar. The pictorial theories of this institute for the arts and of Paul Klee are analyzed in Van der Heide’s watercolours in their wider, ideological and theoretical framework. The serial method and modernist ideals from the twenties and thirties constitute the basis for new, hybrid combinations.
Lena Bergner’s original drawing is called Belichtung/Beschattung and shows a small circle in the upper left from which several rays of light and colour start, to fan out in a larger circle. In her twenty variations on Bergner’s drawing, Van der Heide sets out to examine the fundamental characteristics of watercolour painting such as colour and light. Her works are presented in a horizontal band in the cabinet adjacent to KIOSK’s dome room, like a waving light beam of colour and shape. The space between the colour exercises is charged with ‘cosmic energy’, a concept Paul Klee used to point out that art and nature spring from the same source and are both part of a greater, cosmic whole.

09.12.11 - 22.01.12

Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan

Opening: Friday 9 December 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, 'Subi dura a rudibus', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.

Subi dura a rudibus

The adjoining room at KIOSK becomes a projection space for the film diptych ‘Subi dura a rudibus’ (16mm, 26’, 2010) by the Dutch artist duo Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan. The inspiration for their silent film is a sixteenth-century series of tapestries depicting the 1535 conquest of Tunis under Charles V. The tapestries were designed by Jan Cornelisz. Vermeyen, a painter at the Habsburg court who accompanied the troops of Charles V as an ‘embedded artist’ appointed to make drawings of the expedition.

The film shows the drawn designs mirrored and juxtaposed to the tapestries. The diptych refers to the tension between objectivity and interpretation: the mirror images recall the well-known inkblots of the psychological Rorschach test and confront us with the differences between the original drawings and the tapestry weaver’s translation of them.

09.12.11 - 22.01.12

Slavs and Tatars

Opening: Friday 9 December 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Slavs & Tatars, 'Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.

Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK shows work of international artist collective Slavs and Tatars and of Dutch duo Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan. Both ground their artistic practice in research and explore the interactions between the historical, the social and the political by way of association.

By their own account, the artist collective Slavs and Tatars has, since its inception in 2005, been mapping an area that stretches between the former Berlin Wall and the Great Wall of China. They focus on an oft-overseen cultural overlap between Slavs, Caucasians and Central Asians and humorously but polemically disrupt a univocal Western interpretation. The installations, performances, lectures and print publications that make up these alternative spheres of influence, form a playful mosaic of associations combining elements from a spectrum of high and low culture.

At KIOSK, Slavs and Tatars present a number of works under the collective title Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz. The solo show is in part an elaboration of the project of the same name they presented at the tenth Sharjah Biennial earlier this year. The multimedia Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz shows the unlikely common history of Iran and Poland. The revolutionary potential of handiwork and folklore behind two important geopolitical shifts – the Iranian Revolution of 1979, and the fall of Communism in 1989 heralded by the Polish Solidarność – are activated and explored as a source of mystical protest. This subject was first explored in the 79.89.09. project that consisted of a series of lectures,  a contribution to Berlin-based magazine 032c, a newspaper edition that is being reprinted for the KIOSK show, and the mirror mosaic Resist Resisting God (2010) that is also on display at KIOSK. Further, the central dome room will be taken in by a series of colourful sewn banners boasting re-interpreted, creolized slogans from the Iranian Revolution and the Solidarność movement.

79.89.09.

Author: Slavs and Tatars

The publication is a reissue on the occasion of Slavs and Tatars’s exhibition ‘Friendship of Nations: Polish sh’ite showbiz’ at KIOSK (10.12.2011 – 22.01.2012).

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07.10.11 - 27.11.11

Zin Taylor

Opening: Saturday 8 October 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Zin Taylor, 'Growth', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.

Growth

KIOSK opens the new season with Growth, a solo exhibition by Brussels-based Canadian artist Zin Taylor (1978). Taylor’s work is often rooted in narrative structures that are translated into sculptures, drawings, graphic works, performances and video works.

Taylor’s investigative attitude points to a remarkable fascination for natural forms which he transposes to sculpture through the use of traditional techniques, artisan methods and sculptural principles. It is this, the very nature of sculpture, that the title of the exhibition alludes to; the organic development of form. The works on display in Growth can thus be seen as variations on one central question: how does form materialize? How do works of art grow?

The artist’s ongoing inquiry into the development of a fundamental, sculptural form as a densely layered and organically growing process finds one of its most outspoken realizations in The Bakery of Blok, a work from 2009 that will be reinterpreted for KIOSK’s central hemicycle room. This installation, consisting of a series of materialist ‘units’, unfolds a complex narrative that interacts with the exhibition’s architecture.

Zin Taylor is represented by Galerie Vidal Cuglietta (Brussels); Jessica Bradley Art + Projects (Toronto); and Supportico Lopez (Berlin). Ursula Blickle Stiftung (Kraichtal), Contemporary Art Museum (St. Louis), Miguel Abreu Gallery (New York) and Etablissement d’en Face Projects (Brussels) all hosted solo shows by Taylor. Group shows in which he participated have been held at Witte de With (Rotterdam), Power Plant (Toronto) and Contemporary Art Gallery (Vancouver), among others.

The Allegorical Function Of Dirt: A Discussion With Aki Tsuyuko's Ongakushitsu

Author:

The publication appears on the occasion of Zin Taylor’s exhibition ‘Growth’ at KIOSK (08.10.2011 – 27.11.2011).

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22.04.11 - 12.06.11

Jan De Cock

Opening: Friday 22 April 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Atelier Jan De Cock.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan De Cock, 'Improvise and Overcome', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.

Improvise and Overcome

Jan De Cock (Brussels, 1976) garnered fame with his ‘Denkmal’: monuments, temporary installations made of wooden modules and photographic images that subtly integrate with the architectural and spatial context of their specific location. De Cock lets his interdisciplinary work engage in a dialogue with art-historical, architectural and cinematographical references, leading the visitor through a rhythmic course of repetition, linearity, fragmentation and perspective.

Improvise and Overcome is the title De Cock chose for his creation for the central round space of the KIOSK gallery, where he has installed an ‘infini’. This freestanding structure refers to the nineteenth-century panorama. The installation functions as a support for a series of two-dimensional interventions and a new sculpture.

22.04.11 - 12.06.11

Derek Sullivan

Opening: Friday 22 April 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Derek Sullivan. 'Young Americans', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.

Young Americans

With Derek Sullivan and Jan De Cock, KIOSK has invited two artists who examine the history of contemporary art through their works. Both artists suggest that the interpretation of this history and its visual heritage is not a self-contained narrative, but always contains a new proposition.

Derek Sullivan (Toronto, 1976) makes drawings, gouaches and sculptural work in which he combines the visual aesthetics of American geometric abstraction, modernist design and graphic art with shapes and forms borrowed from the realm of conceptual art.

Sullivan’s characteristic large-format monochrome prints function as a backdrop for drawings and gouaches that combine geometric patterns and textual elements. Fascinated by artist’s books, Sullivan regularly publishes work, making ample use of the possibilities of print-on-demand.

Young Americans, the title of his KIOSK show, refers to the exhibition catalogues the New York MoMA published during the 1950s, an age where the interest for contemporary American art peaked. Fragments from these catalogues are being reproduced as posters, and combine with drawings and the fan-shaped architecture of the KIOSK cabinet rooms to make up separate pages of an imaginary book.

04.02.11 - 13.03.11

Thea Djordjadze & screening room: Anna Franceschini

Opening: Friday 4 February 2011 - 20:00

Exhibition
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Thea Djordjadze, 'Quiet speech in wide circulation', 2011. Photo Yana Foque.
Anna Franceschini, filmstill 'Nothing is more mysterious. A fact that is well explained', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Anna Franceschini, filmstill 'Nothing is more mysterious. A fact that is well explained', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Anna Franceschini, filmstill 'Nothing is more mysterious. A fact that is well explained', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Anna Franceschini, filmstill 'Nothing is more mysterious. A fact that is well explained', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.

Quiet Speech in Wide Circulation

KIOSK hosts ‘Quiet Speech in Wide Circulation’, Georgian artist Thea Djordjadze’s (Tbilisi, 1971) first ever solo show in Belgium. The exhibition’s title refers to the venue’s original function as an anatomical theatre, where even the slightest whisper resonates throughout the room. Much like an object falling in water and drawing concentric circles on its surface, so Djordjadze seems to encircle her work, the KIOSK space and the visitor in a single movement, getting communication between them going.

Taking over the hemicycle’s floor surface, the level scaffolding the artist has forged effectively functions as an offset to the impressive, upward dome. These steel supports covered with foamed plastic subsequently invite to be interpreted as a kind of sun deck for the visitor to lie down on – receptive and open to the slightest whisper.

Djordjadze’s work starts with everyday, kneadable materials like plaster, ceramics, sponge, cardboard, clay, textile or papier-mâché which the artist shapes into modest though firmly present sculptures. These are positioned in space, surrounded by simple architectural wooden or metal structures that recall classical modernist aesthetics and whose stark linearity contrasts sharply with the sculptures’ organic and amorphous, ‘unfinished’ surfaces. Further juxtaposed with cryptic drawings and cultural artefacts like nomad rugs, all these elements combine to make a very specific amalgam of materials, shapes, objects and cultures that erodes its parts’ historical ideologies to shape a new, metaphysical result.

Thea Djordjadze works and resides in Berlin. She recently had solo exhibitions in a.o. Castillo/Coralles, Paris (2010), Kunsthalle Basel (2009) and Kunstverein Nürnberg (2008). Her work was also on display in group shows at the Rubbel Family Collection, Le CREDAC Ivry-sur-Seine and Hayward Gallery London. She also took part in the 5th Berlin Biennale (2008) and has collaborated with Rosemarie Trockel (for the 9th Biennale de Lyon, 2007, amongst other occasions). Thea Djordjadze is represented by Sprüth Magers in Berlin and London.

Screening room:
The side room adjacent to the hemicycle is transformed into a screening room for Nothing is more mysterious. A fact that is well explained (16mm transferred to DVD, 2010) by Anna Franceschini (Pavia, 1979). During a 2009-2010 residency at the Amsterdam Rijksakademie for visual arts, the Italian artist was captivated by the tradition of the pictorial still life and the private dimension of indoor life. This interest led her to the discrete Amsterdam Pianola Museum. In only two long movements, the camera explores the surfaces and textures of the objects in this intimate space. The result can be read as a long unwinding of visual memories, a recapitulation of art historical references; the film itself as an ‘object in movement’.

10.12.10 - 23.01.11

Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux

Opening: Saturday 11 December 2010 - 20:00

Exhibition
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Geert Goiris & Vincent Lamouroux, 'Turbulence', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.

Turbulence

Turbulence is the moniker under which KIOSK lets the works of French artist Vincent Lamouroux and Belgian photographer Geert Goiris interact. Both artists employ their practice as a means to examine notions as time and space, fiction and reality, landscape and composition. The results are often real or constructed spaces which strike the viewer as simultaneously familiar and alien.

Goiris and Lamouroux have collaborated before, and for this occasion they have again decided to take a common point of departure: the concept of ‘turbulence’, and the ways it can spark off the interaction between their work, the space it inhabits, and the visitor. The dialogue between their respective work is deliberately stimulated in an interplay of light, vistas and contrastive vertical and horizontal lines in space. The ‘turbulence’ between both arrangements is made palpable both in the harmony and the contrast between the upward force in Lamouroux’ sculpture in the hemicycle room on the one hand and the pull of gravity on Goiris’ hanging photo prints in the side room on the other. This turbulence manifests itself as a continuous struggle between perceptions.

Vincent Lamouroux (Saint-Germain-en-Laye, 1974) resides and lives in Paris. He creates spaces that appear both architectural and sculptural, both organic and constructed. His work originates in the notion that a sculptural intervention will influence the entire space. Often impressive interventions destabilize visitors’ orientation. Next to a number of smaller spatial interventions, Lamouroux presents the work Hélioscope in KIOSK’s hemicycle room. Hélioscope prompts an immediate novel, vertical interpretation of the room: the 8 meter high spiral staircase leans forward into the room, effectuating a dynamic upward movement.  The upwards structure of the staircase lifts up the room, its whiteness absorbs the light and its subtle imbalance disorients the viewer. The artist received the ‘Fondation d’Entreprise Ricard’ prize in 2006. KIOSK is the first venue to show Lamouroux’ work in Belgium.

Belgian photographer Geert Goiris (Bornem, 1971) currently lives in Antwerp, from where he is steadily making his way in the international art scene. Goiris won this year’s Baloise Art Prize at Art Basel, and he had recent solo shows in the Hamburger Kunsthalle and at CAB Burgos. Until 16 January 2011, his work is on display in the group show Fresh Hell at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. Goiris’ photographs go beyond merely recording as they make viewers instantly feel the alienating nearness of the abandoned, isolated places they show. Time and space are being cancelled out in a play with light, depth and subject matter. Goiris emphasizes both nature in itself and the traces of human presence in dilapidated architectural and utopian landscapes. Goiris’ landscape shots are often made using a slow shutter speed, a method which seems to impose on the viewer a parallel way of contemplating the photographs: they demand slow observation, allowing the gaze to adapt time’s own pace in penetrating the rows of trees and exploring the infinite horizons. Next to a number of earlier works, Goiris will present a new series of photo prints, Giants which is being presented at KIOSK.

With support of the French Embassy in Brussels. With special thanks to Chapelle Jeanne d’Arc Art Center and Brionne Industry who produced Helioscope for Vincent Lamouroux. Geert Goiris is affiliated researcher at Sint Lukas Higher College for Art and Design in Brussels (BE).

09.10.10 - 28.11.10

Zoe Beloff

Opening: Sunday 10 October 2010 - 20:00

Exhibition
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.
Zoe Beloff, 'Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972', 2010. Photo Yana Foque.

Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle, 1926-1972

For the exhibition at KIOSK, artist Zoe Beloff (°1958, Edinburgh, Scotland) proposed to adapt her most recent project to the particular architecture of KIOSK. ‘Dreamland: The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle’ originated in 2009, when the Coney Island museum invited Zoe Beloff to create an exhibition in celebration of the centennial of Sigmund Freud’s visit to Coney Island.

Beloff resurrected the forgotten world of the Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society, along with the visionary ideas of its founder, Albert Grass. The lively exhibition was well received by the public and the project was covered by the New York Times, Art in America and Cabinet. The show features ‘dream films’ made by members of this society, a working model of an amusement park designed by Albert Grass to illustrate Freud’s theories, as well as drawings, letters and many unusual artefacts. The KIOSK-version of this exhibition project is enhanced with the introduction of an exciting series of comic strip-like graphic explorations. The exhibition at KIOSK was initiated by Belgian curator and researcher Edwin Carels.

Beloff works with a wide range of media including film, stereoscopic projection performance, interactive media, installation and drawing. Her artistic interest lies in finding ways to graphically manifest the unconscious processes of the mind. Therefore her role as an artist can be considered as an interface between the real and the imaginary. The exhibition’s depiction of historical artefacts highlights the ambiguity of Beloff’s role in its creation. When visitors enter her version of “Dreamland”, they are entirely free to form their own opinion. Beloff has a very personal way of eliding the role of archivist and creator in conjuring up Coney Island’s hidden history.

Zoe Beloff moved to New York in 1980 to study at Columbia University where she received an MFA in Film. Her work has been featured in international exhibitions and screenings at venues including the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Freud Dream Museum in St. Petersburg, and the Pompidou Centre in Paris. In 2009 she participated in the Athens Biennale, and she has an upcoming project in M HKA Museum in Antwerp. She has been working with the Christine Burgin Gallery on a number of projects, including prints and books. The exhibition in the Coney Island Museum was accompanied with a book and a DVD published by Christine Burgin and edited by Zoe Beloff, The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle. Beloff’s new book, The Adventures of a Dreamer by Albert Grass, will be launched in KIOSK during the opening. A more extensive biography can be found on her website www.zoebeloff.com.

The artist would like to thank Eric Muzzy, director of the Coney Island Museum Aaron Beebe, Christine Burgin and the New York State Council on the Arts.

07.05.10 - 13.06.10

Edith Dekyndt

Opening: Saturday 8 May 2010 - 20:00

Exhibition
Edith Dekyndt, 'Get Out of My Cloud', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Edith Dekyndt, 'Get Out of My Cloud', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Edith Dekyndt, 'Get Out of My Cloud', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Edith Dekyndt, 'Get Out of My Cloud', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Edith Dekyndt, 'Get Out of My Cloud', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Edith Dekyndt, 'Get Out of My Cloud', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Edith Dekyndt, 'Get Out of My Cloud', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Edith Dekyndt, 'Get Out of My Cloud', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Edith Dekyndt, 'Get Out of My Cloud', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Edith Dekyndt, 'Get Out of My Cloud', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.

Get Out of My Cloud

The second exhibition in the new location shows work of Edith Dekyndt (B) and Rik Moens (B), two artists that share a fascination for the experiment and the proces, both artists integrate the aspect of coincidence in their actual physical form.

Edith Dekyndt (°1960, Ypres) lives and works in Tournai. She is at this moment seen as one of the most important artists of Belgium’s French-speaking community. Edith Dekyndt’s work is characterized by a minimal, aesthetic visual language. In video works, sound works, installations and sculptures, she explores physical phenomena (including soundwaves and light), manipulates invisible elements (dust and magnetic particles) and records ephemeral events.

The artist attempts to sensitize the individual as a ‘viewer’ by sharpening our sense of perception. Edith Dekyndt’s Get Out of My Cloud exhibition includes a new installation, specially created for KIOSK’s central hemicycle space,Carousel. This installation gets form throughout image, text and sound.

07.05.10 - 13.06.10

Rik Moens

Opening: Friday 7 May 2010 - 20:00

Exhibition
Rik Moens, 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens, 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens, 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens, 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Rik Moens 'Proposal of the Props', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.

Proposal of the Props

The second exhibition in the new location shows work of Rik Moens (B) and Edith Dekyndt (B), two artists that share a fascination for the experiment and the proces, both artists integrate the aspect of coincidence in their actual physical form.

Rik Moens (°1969, Ninove) is an artist who repeatedly seeks ways to test the limits of his medium, without repudiating painting tradition. As a painter, Moens continually questions the conventions and the limitations of the medium, so that such fundamental cornerstones as format, medium, background, signature, texture and colour are repeatedly examined in depth. At KIOSK, under the title,Proposal of the Props, Rik Moens presents a recent series of paintings that have never before been exhibited. Each of these works exerts its strong physical presence into the space. This is not so much due to their monumentality as to their specific evolution, whereby in almost ritual fashion, they are built up, layer upon layer: paintings as the performative carriers of an extremely conscientious process of creation, which sometimes takes months to complete.

19.02.10 - 28.03.10

Mekhitar Garabedian

Opening: Friday 19 February 2010 - 20:00

Exhibition
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Mekhitar Garabedian, 'Young Man Blues', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.

Young Man Blues

The first exhibition in our new location shows work of Mekhitar Garabedian (Syria/Belgium) and Susanne Kriemann (Germany), two artists that have a particular interest for the relations between history, identity, time and the memory of a place.

The work of Mekhitar Garabedian (°1977, Allepo, Syria) can be approached as a constant digging up of his personal and complex identity as an immigrant.
Garabedian was born in Syria, but has Armenian roots: his grandparents fled from the Armenian genocide. In 1981 the family immigrated once again because of the Libanon civil war. Since his childhood Garabedian lives in Belgium. The artist works with different media such as sound, text, video, installation and photography. His work deals with the idea that history and cultural identity are constructed trough conditioning. The exhibition Young Man Blues at KIOSK shows an ensemble of textual works, a photographic project in the shape of a publication and an installation with t-shirts on which a reference to the Armenian culture is printed.

The exhibition is realised with the kind contribution of Hoet Bekaert Gallery.

Yavreeges Hokeet Seerem

Author:

The publication appears on the occasion of Mekhitar Garabedian’s exhibition ‘Young Man Blues’ at KIOSK (20.02.2010 – 28.03.2010).

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19.02.10 - 28.03.10

Susanne Kriemann

Opening: Friday 19 February 2010 - 20:00

Exhibition
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Marijke Respeel.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.
Susanne Kriemann, 'Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory', 2010. Photo Sander Buyck.

Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory

The first exhibition in our new location shows work of Susanne Kriemann (Germany) and Mekhitar Garabedian (Syria/Belgium), two artists that have a particular interest for the relations between history, identity, time and the memory of a place.

The work of Susanne Kriemann (°1972, Erlangen, Germany) deals with the subject of research into the past of modern history. Kriemann is mainly using photography in which her own images and archive material are exhibited in the form of displays. Using an associative working method allows the artist to ‘dig towards the past’ and to disassociate ‘the idea of modernity’ from all ideological connotations and in this way analyze the writing of recent history as a formal system of organization. In Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory Kriemann mixes images from her own expedition to the desert of Syria, archaeological digging sites in Mesopotamia and the photographic archive of Agatha Christie. Besides being a writer Christie also was a photographer for the British government at digging sites on Syria and Iraq. On the occasion of this exhibition, an artist book will be published by Roma Publications.

The exhibition is a co-production of Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and KIOSK.

Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory

Author: Dieter Roelstraete, Wim Waelput, Axel John Wieder

The publication appears on the occasion of Susanne Kriemann’s exhibition ‘Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory’ at KIOSK (19.02.2010 - 28.03.2010).

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29.10.06 - 03.01.10

Archive Pavilion

Exhibition
#16 Vaast Colson, in collaboration with Gerard Herman, 2009.
#16 Vaast Colson, in collaboration with Gerard Herman, 2009.
#01 Koenraad Dedobbeleer, 2006.
#01 Koenraad Dedobbeleer, 2006.
#02 Raphaël Van Lerberghe, 2006.
#02 Raphaël Van Lerberghe, 2006.
#03 Pieterjan Ginckels, 2007.
#03 Pieterjan Ginckels, 2007.
#04 Honoré d'O, 2007.
#04 Honoré d'O, 2007.
#05 Stefaan Dheedene, 2007.
#05 Stefaan Dheedene, 2007.
#06 Geert Goiris, 2007.
#06 Geert Goiris, 2007.
#07 Brody & Paetau, 2007 - 2008.
#07 Brody & Paetau, 2007 - 2008.
#08 Evert De Francq, 2008.
#08 Evert De Francq, 2008.
#09 Freek Wambacq, 2008.
#09 Freek Wambacq, 2008.
#10 Pascal Martin Tayou, 2008.
#10 Pascal Martin Tayou, 2008.
#11 Gabriel Lester, 2008.
#11 Gabriel Lester, 2008.
#12 Sophie Nys, 2008 - 2009.
#12 Sophie Nys, 2008 - 2009.
#13 Christoph Meier, 2009.
#13 Christoph Meier, 2009.
#14 Danai Anesiadou, 2009.
#14 Danai Anesiadou, 2009.
#15 Olivia Plender, 2009.
#15 Olivia Plender, 2009.
#16 Vaast Colson in collaboration with Michiel Ceulers, 2009.
#16 Vaast Colson in collaboration with Michiel Ceulers, 2009.
#17 David Bade, 2009 - 2010.
#17 David Bade, 2009 - 2010.

#01 KOENRAAD DEDOBBELEER
29.10.2006 - 03.12 2006
Dingen - Text by Lars Kwakkenbos (NL)

#02 RAPHAËL VAN LERBERGHE
16.12.2006 - 28.01 2007
Text by Benoît Dusart (NL)
Text by Benoît Dusart (FR)
Text by Bart De Block (NL)

#03 PIETERJAN GINCKELS
World Wide Winter
16.02.2007 - 25.03.2007
Text by Tom Nys (NL)
Text by Piet Vanrobaeys (NL)

#04 HONORÉ δ’O
19.04.2007 - 27.05.2007
Text by Piet Vanrobaeys (NL)
Text by Honoré δ’O (NL)

#05 STEFAAN DHEEDENE
07.06.2007 - 08.07.2007
Buro Jackie - Text by Frank Snyders (NL)
Sun-Lite - Text by Ann Cesteleyn en Björn Scherlippens (NL)

#06 GEERT GOIRIS
Slow Fast
11.10.2007 - 18.11.2007
Text by Francis Smets (NL)
SLOW FAST of Geert Goiris - Text by Steven Jacobs (NL)

#07 ONDREJ BRODY & KRISTOFER PAETAU
Painting China Now
29.11.07 - 12.01.08
Painting China Now - Text by Paul Haworth (ENG)
Ziek. Tussen China en de States - Text by Piet Vanrobaeys (NL)

#08 EVERT DEFRANCQ
Blob
28.02.2008 - 30.03.2008
Vormvereisten - Text by Pierre de Gelder (NL)

#09 FREEK WAMBACQ
17.04.08 - 25.05.08
Portrait of the Artist as a Dice Man - Text by Bram Van Damme (NL)
Review Freek Wambacq - Text by Bram Van Damme (NL)

#10 PASCALE MARTHINE TAYOU
KIOSK Royal
19.06.08 - 20.07.08
Een koninklijke bezetting - Text by Hans Martens (NL)
Trompe l’oeil - Text by Hans Martens (NL)

#11 GABRIEL LESTER
One Man Show - One Man Band
09.10.08 - 16.11.08
Gabriel Lester: One Man Show - One Man Band - Text by Ann Cesteleyn (NL)
One, Two, Three, Four, One - Text by Dieter Roelstraete (NL)

#12 SOPHIE NYS
04.12.2008 - 11.01.2009
Review Sophie Nys - Text by Lars Kwakkenbos (NL)

#13 CHRISTOPH MEIER
Proposal for a Discotheque
29.01.2009 - 15.03.2009
Preview Christoph Meier - Text by Diana Baldon (ENG)
Proposal for a Discotheque: Christoph Meier - Text by Miriam Kathrein (ENG)

#14 DANAI ANESIADOU
I kiss your ectoplasm, like I would a shark
02.04.09 - 03.05.09
Nancy and Tonya - Text by Peter Waechtler (ENG)

#15 OLIVIA PLENDER
21.05.2009 - 28.06.2009
Olivia Plender for KIOSK - Text by Anna Colin (ENG)
The World Turned Upside Down - Text by Anna Colin (ENG)

#16 VAAST COLSON
01.10.2009 - 01.11.2009
We Will Never Surrender - Interview by Lieven Segers - Addendum by Bert Jacobs (NL)
Weblog of this project: Vaast Colson in KIOSK

#17 DAVID BADE
26.11.2009 - 03.01.2010
Kiosk der Emotionen - Text by David Bade (NL)
David Bade’s plezierboot zet koers richting KIOSK - Text by Liene Aerts (NL)